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The Wild Dogs – NY Bowhunter

Coyote Hunting

The Wild Dogs

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Michael Shaw of Westchester County headed to the woods early one morning in hopes of coming face to face with a mature whitetail. As day broke Mike noticed some movement in a nearby field and to his amazement, it was a pack of five coyotes.

One of the coyotes broke off the pack and headed right towards Mike’s stand. As the coyote came within 25 yards, Mike drew back and sent his Rage broadhead right through the coyote’s boiler room. After the dog hit the ground Mike looked up and couldn’t believe his eyes. The other four coyotes ran in and started circling Mike’s tree as to taunt him for killing one of their pack. This went on for over twenty-five minutes before they decided to run off.

After making sure the coyotes left for good, Mike climbed down out of his tree to retrieve his trophy. A gorgeous forty five-pound coyote laid steps away. It’s a great trophy and not many people can say the arrowed a coyote. It’s definitely something to be proud of. Congrats to Mike on a great coyote and great story.

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Coyote Hunting

Coyote Hunting

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A few of us from Team NYB went out to the woods early this morning in the 4-degree weather to try and call some coyotes in. We had two rifles, a shotgun, a bow, and our camera equipment. There were tracks everywhere and the cottontail calls and fawn distress calls did little for us.

It was fun to get out there though and just be back in the woods. Deer season is a long way off and it will be nice to get back out there once the snow melts and see if we can find some sheds and try our luck again at some predator hunting.

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Team NYB Ends Turkey Season with a Double Bearded Bird – Part 1 – NY Bowhunter

Turkey Hunting

Team NYB Ends Turkey Season with a Double Bearded Bird – Part 1

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It was 4:15 a.m. on May 31st – the final morning of the 2010 Spring Turkey Season – when Dero and I met each other at the gate of the farm.

The season had been a tough one with few birds coming in close enough for a shot. Although we were lucky enough to hear gobbles on almost every occasion there were only two mornings that we had birds within gun or bow range.

Earlier in the week, we had hunted upstate only to have coyotes ruin one morning and oversleeping ruin the next. It was now or never for Team NYB.

The full moon lit the farm road as we walked through the field to our ground blind. We had recently asked the farmer to till some of the lands so we could plant for deer season, but had yet to hunt over it for turkey. It was this freshly tilled soil that would help us succeed on a late-season gobbler.

I first placed the Jake decoy in the grass where we had usually spread the decoys on previous hunts, but after returning to the blind Dero suggested I move the decoys. The field had grown so tall that the birds would have a very hard time seeing the decoys through the grass. The freshly tilled soil was at a 45-degree angle from our blind. Here the decoys would be visible from a distance and still within our shooting range.

Daybreak soon came and the songbirds played their tune. Missing was the sound of geese honking in the nearby river and turkeys gobbling from the roost. Then it happened – we heard our first gobble!

Dero and I looked at one another and were filled with excitement – it was the first time all season the birds were roosted on our side of the river! A few minutes later we heard a hen yelp – another first for us at the farm. On our previous hunts the hens never made a sound.

Patiently we waited for the birds to make their first move. A few minutes later we heard three short yelps behind us. The sounds kept getting closer and closer until the birds appeared in the field to our left…

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Turkey Hunting

Spring Turkey Season Opens May 1 in New York

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Bowhunters take to the woods this spring after weary old gobblers in New York.

It’s my favorite time of year after deer season – the spring turkey season (probably because it’s the only other time I’m out hunting with my bow). Following suit of previous seasons, the 2014 spring turkey season opens May 1 in all of upstate New York lying north of the Bronx-Westchester County boundary and the annual youth turkey hunting weekend is April 26-27. The youth turkey hunt is open in all of upstate New York and Suffolk County.

Not nearly as popular as deer hunting, there only 100,000 turkey hunters expected to head afield this spring. Honestly, I don’t know how anyone can’t get excited about calling to a bird and have it respond and watch it work its way in. It’s a very interactive hunt.

According to the DEC, hunters must have a turkey hunting permit in addition to their small game hunting or sportsman license (if purchased before Feb. 1) or hunting license (if purchased after Feb. 1).

  • Shooting hours are from one-half hour before sunrise to noon each day.
  • Hunters may take two bearded turkeys during the spring season, but only one bird per day.
  • Hunters may not use rifles or handguns firing a bullet. Hunters may hunt with a shotgun or handgun loaded with shot sizes no larger than No. 2 or smaller than No. 8, or with a bow and arrow.
  • Crossbows may not be used for the spring 2014 turkey season.
  • Successful hunters must fill out the tag that comes with their turkey permit and immediately attach it to any turkey harvested.
  • Successful hunters must report their harvest within seven days of taking a bird.

One thing that caught my eye is that the state’s enacted 2014-15 budget includes language authorizing the use of crossbows for hunting under certain circumstances. So while hunters cannot use crossbows to take wild turkey during the 2014 spring season, they might be able to in 2015. It will be interesting to see if the changes go through for next year and what affect that would have on the number of hunters taking to the field for turkey hunting.

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Turkey Hunting

Bowhunting Turkey in New York

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Teresa took this big longbeard on the opening day of the 2012 Spring Turkey Hunting Season in Orange County, New York. This is Teresa’s first turkey kill and she got the job done with a heart-pounding 23-yard shot. Congrats to Teresa on an awesome longbeard!

Did you have success this spring? It was tough with the warm weather we had in April before the opener.

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Turkey Hunting

NY Bowhunter Takes Turkey During Fall Archery Season

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Last Friday morning my cousin Ken had the day off to enjoy a day afield. He was set up in his tree well before first light, but the morning was really slow and Ken only saw one deer. The tall spike came down the hill 50 yards to his right and kept on walking to wherever it was that he was going.

With no rubs or scrapes in the general area, Ken and his father Nick decided to hunt a different area that afternoon. On the drive to their hunting spot that afternoon they spotted a flock of turkeys and ten deer out in a field just a few door down from where they would be hunting.

Ken headed to his stand at the top of the hill and waited in anticipation for the deer and turkey to leave the field and move back into the hardwoods. Around 5:00 pm the woods exploded with noise and movement and the deer and turkey came barreling through the woods. Shortly after, Ken heard a lady yelling at her dog who must have decided it would be fun to chase the deer and turkeys out of the nearby field.

Then Ken heard a single turkey coming towards him from the bottom of the hill. Ken got ready and drew back with the bird at 20 yards. The bird took two more steps and Ken made a chirping sound to stop it and let the arrow fly. The bird only made it a few more yards before going down.

Congrats to Ken on taking a turkey with the bow, that’s never an easy thing!

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Shot Placement – NY Bowhunter

Archery Tips

Shot Placement

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After having some of the worst luck with shooting deer this season, I decided to see what I could do to help control my “deer fever” and make better shots. Last time I was out I caught myself flinching before the trigger release went off, which is one reason that the shots I’ve taken that should be chip shots, have turned into lethal wounds instead of instant kills.

On my first deer of the season I simply rushed the shot. The doe was within 15 yards and started to become more cautious so I rushed the shot before she had a chance to spook. Since that deer, I have been telling myself that I have time to shoot a deer and I don’t need to pull the trigger the second my pin rests on the deer’s vitals. Last weekend, I drew on the deer before they got to my shooting lane and followed them with my sight pin for almost a minute before taking the shot. It’s not necessary to follow an animal with your pin for an entire minute, but in this case it was helping me stay calm and focus on shooting the deer when it was calm and relaxed. After the shot is when I really start shaking.

After shooting my first deer, a second deer came out of the thicket and presented me with a shot opportunity. I was still shaking and had sat down so I looked away and took a few deep breaths until my “deer fever” was under control. Then I slowly drew my bow back and placed the pin right behind the deer’s shoulder. Once I had a tiny spot on the deer I slowly squeezed the trigger until it surprised me and went off. It is important that you don’t pull the trigger and force the shot, this will only lead to bad shot placement and will wound a deer instead of killing it, trust me I know and you don’t want to find out.

When you see a buck and you know it’s a big buck that you want to shoot, then stop looking at its antlers. This will only make you more nervous and put more unnecessary thoughts in your head. Instead, focus on where the deer is traveling and where your shot opportunity will come from. Then pick out a tiny spot behind the shoulder, slowly draw your bow back and take aim. If the deer is moving you may want to grunt with your mouth to stop the deer if you are not comfortable shooting at a moving target. Once the deer has stopped to investigate the origin of the sound – that’s you up in the tree – then squeeze the trigger with even pressure until it fires and the arrow hits its mark.

After the arrow is release hold your form and watch the spot you aimed for on the deer. Once the deer is hit you should quickly reload incase a second shot presents itself. This is another thing to note – if you have the opportunity for a second shot do not think if you should take it or not, just take it because you won’t have a third opportunity. The second deer I shot had the arrow find the deer’s shoulder and rolled the deer twice before she laid still at 30 yards away. I should have nocked a second arrow and shot her through the lungs while she was laying down. Unfortunately, I made the mistake of saying to myself “well, she’s laying down so she must be hit good, she won’t be going anywhere.” Boy way I wrong, the doe got up after 2 minutes and “walked it off” like a quarterback taking a hit. I was completely dumbfounded and extremely mad at myself for passing on a finishing shot. Always take a finishing shot if you can. If the deer isn’t lying motionless in front of you, it could probably use another shot, so take it. I once put four arrows through a spike that I shot at 15 yards with a spine shot. I had broke his back on the first shot, but he dragged himself about 10 more yards and I shot him about every 3 yards until he was finished moving. It was unnecessary in this case, but I would rather overshoot a deer and make sure it was dead than wound a deer and have it run off and die days later.

A good way to practice this is to take a 3D deer target into the field with you and practice shots on the 3D target from various angles and distances. If I had practiced this a lot more I may have been able to place better shots on the deer I have released arrows on. One thing that’s for sure is that practice and actual hunting situations are not the same. I can shoot with the best of them at targets all day long, but when the moment of truth arrives, sometimes I loose it mentally. Stay focused, stay calm, breathe, and slowly squeeze that trigger when you are presented with a shot opportunity. And remember, if you have any doubts then don’t take the shot. It’s better to let an animal go and hope for a second chance another day than to wound a deer and leave it for the coyotes.

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Archery Tips

Keep Your Bowhunting Skills Sharp with 3D Shooting

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Over the last few weekends we’ve been headed over to Blue Mountain Sportsman Center to shoot 3D. The course has been a lot of fun to shoot. There’s several targets to shoot at including deer, turkey, bear, and fox. The terrain makes it very realistic practice for hunting with shots at inclines and declines to simulate actual hunting scenarios.

One thing I like to do is shoot from the furthest stakes and guess the yardage. Then after we all shoot we range the target to see how close we were to guessing the distance. This really helps me to learn how to judge distance in the field and is a valuable tool for when an animal catches you off guard in the field. Shooting from the furthest stakes also make the closer shots seem easier.

If you haven’t been out shooting 3D this summer then you better hurry up and get out there because hunting season will be here before you know it. Blue Mountain Sportsman Center is open Thursday – Sunday and holidays. Shooting a round of 3D costs $12 with a county park pass and is $15 without a park pass.

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Archery Tips

Indoor Archery Leagues at Extreme Archery

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Team NYB will be joining the Hunter League at Extreme Archery set to begin on September 3rd. The Hunter League will be held on Fridays for 6 weeks and feature various animal targets.

We’re looking forward to participating in the league and sharpening our skills for the upcoming season. The indoor league is a great way to meet fellow archers and practice shooting under a little bit of pressure!

Here are the details on the Indoor Archery Leagues at Extreme Archery:

Kids League ($70, 8 weeks)
– begins Saturday, September 4th @ 10:00am

300 Target League ($90, 7 weeks)
– begins Wednesday, September 1st @ 6:30pm

Hunter League ($90, 6 weeks)
– begins Friday, September 3rd @ 6:30pm

Traditional League (TBD)
– call to find out more

To sign up for any of the Indoor Archery Leagues call Extreme Archery at 914-777-7500.

Extreme Archery is located at 801 East Boston Post Rd, Mamaroneck, NY 10543.

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Archery Tips

How to Set the Perfect Treestand

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This is something new I’m adding to my arsenal of tricks this season to help me set the perfect stand (works for trail cams too)! It’s called the Photographer’s Ephemeris, a tool designed to help landscape photographers take the perfect picture at sunrise or sunset.

The tool allows you to pick a location, date and time to see exactly where the sun and moon will be. This allows you to follow the path of the sun and moon on any given date and at any given time.

So how does this help the hunter? Simple. It allows the hunter to find a stand location on the map and then see how the sun will rise and set during the hunting season so that the sun is never in the hunter’s eyes.

I entered the location of our lease in the program and changed the date to opening day. Where we have our stands situated is in the perfect spot with the sun rising to our right and circling behind us before setting to our left. That means if the deer are out in the hunting plot where we hope to shoot them we will have the sun behind us which will make it much harder for the deer to pick us out of the tree.

This is a great tool I will be playing around with more and more this season as I hang some tree stands over the next few weeks. Below is a video on how it works:

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Scout for Success – NY Bowhunter

Shed Hunting

Scout for Success

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After traveling more frequently to the West coast this year than ever before, it was nice to finally be back in New York. I had a few days off since I had been working straight since February 4th and decided to spend some time on my hunting grounds in search of sheds and learning how the deer move through the area.
I saw plenty of deer tracks while searching the suburbs of Connecticut but came up empty-handed in the shed department. I actually couldn’t walk anywhere without stepping on deer tracks. The main reason was that the deer was still using the land. In fact, I jumped several groups of deer and counted 28 in total as they ran in every direction through the small woodlot. I also stumbled upon a bachelor group of Toms that I watched several times during the hunting season. The 6 long beards would make a trip under my deer stand almost daily to pick on corn and another mast. I may have to return for turkey season!

 

The closest thing I found to a shed was an arrow I had fired at a deer, but never found and this:

I am unsure if this is a deer I had shot during the season but never recovered or if it was attacked by coyotes. I do know I followed the blood trail of a doe right by this area, but it continued on for another 500 yards into a swamp. It is possible that the deer made a large circle and tried to return to this area, but I guess I will never know.

Is anyone else out there walking through the woods? Any sheds found lately?

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Shed Hunting

Why Deer Antlers are a Hunter’s Best Friend

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Antlers are the first thing most hunters think of when it comes to deer. For decades, hunters have gone out into the wilderness to hunt deer. The majority of them love the venison they will bring home after a successful hunt. However, as the sport of deer hunting has grown over the years, and deer populations are thriving, more hunters are being driven by an opportunity to bring home a buck they can put in the record books. Man caves across the country are featuring big bucks on their walls as trophies of the sport they love. Serious hunters go as far as managing parcels of land with the specific goal of growing big bucks, with big antlers. It has become an obsession by many in more ways than one.

The obsession doesn’t stop when hunting season is over either. Once the season closes, many hunters keep trail cameras out and wait to see when the bucks on their property have shed their antlers. Shed hunting has become a sport of its own. If a hunter has missed out on a big buck he knew was on his property during deer season, it can be a painful experience. All of the effort and time some use to hunt a specific deer can be heartbreaking at the end of the season if unable to bring him home. So the next best thing is to go out and hopefully find that deers antlers once they’ve dropped. The antlers become a trophy themselves, and most hunters will be ecstatic when they find them. Another reason that hunters look for sheds is to get a good idea of the age and size of deer on their property. This comes back to deer management. By collecting the sheds, they will have an idea of how many bucks are on the property, and which of them will be mature enough the following year to put on the “hit list”.

There are other reason for collecting shed antlers that don’t just attract hunters. Many people like to give them to their dogs to chew on. We all know that dogs love to chew on stuff. Sticks, raw hides, bones. The problem with most of those things is they don’t last very long. Deer antlers on the other hand, last much longer than the conventional chew toys. It may take a dog over a year to diminish a deer antler. Another use for antlers is to sell. The price of deer antlers has been steadily rising and you could say, have become a hot commodity. People buy antlers to make knives and silverware with, to cut up and sell as dog bones, or even to make things like lamps, and chandeliers. I’ve seen sets of antlers go for hundreds of dollars online.

Overall, there are many uses for deer antlers. They are wonderful trophies and are a key part of any deer management plan. Deer antlers are also great chew toys for dogs, and make a number of other decorative household items. It’s no wonder that deer antlers are a hunter’s best friend.

Jeff Stevens is a writer for the hunting and fishing site Hunter’s Guide. He loves to hunt, fish, and experience all things outdoors. Jeff recently wrote an article about Deer antler growth.

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Shed Hunting

2012 Shed Hunting Contest Winners Announced

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After miles of walking through the woods, this year’s contestants picked up some really nice sheds. You voted and the winners of the 2012 Shed Hunting Contest are:

1st place – deerhunter1127
2nd place – autumn rush
3rd place – mbucks27

Thank you to all who entered this year’s contest and we hope to see you again next year!

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Shed Hunting

Vote for the Winners of the 2012 Shed Hunting Contest

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The 2012 Shed Hunting Contest has come to a close on the NYBowhunter.com Forum. Vote for the winners on NYBowhunter.com.

Today marks the final day of the 2012 Shed Hunting Contest on the NYBowhunter.com Forum. It was a great season for shed hunters across the state and we’ve had several entries into this year’s contest.

Now it’s up to you to decide who wins! Here are our contestants and some of their finds. You can see all the sheds found on the NYBowhunter.com Forum.

NYB member AutumnRush is no stranger to shedding hunting and finds several good sheds each season. He’s also got a knack for photography. This was one of the largest sheds he found this season under one of the largest rubs I’ve ever seen.

Another shed fanatic on the NYB Forum is Deerhunter1127. He doesn’t just find sheds, he finds A LOT of them! This year he came in with 54 sheds! That’s incredible!

Some shed hunters stick it out to the end and NYB member Mbucks27 picked up shed after shed until the woods greened up after the warm weather hit in April. Check out his finds!

 

NYB member Mbucks27 found several nice sheds including a nice matching pair that he mounted on a reproduction skull.


During the 2012 shed hunting season, Psebrute picked up 6 shed antlers and found a skull of a 6-point buck.

One of the coolest sheds found this season was a large palmated shed found by NYB member Mattysams.

So now it’s up to you to decide who wins! Vote using the poll on the upper right corner of NYBowhunter.com. Voting ends at 9:00 PM EST on Friday, May 11th!

A special thanks to our sponsors including Minnesota Workwear (like them on facebook)

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Reader’s Pics – Trail Cam Bears – NY Bowhunter

Bear Hunting

Reader’s Pics – Trail Cam Bears

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With all the talk about deer season coming up I was beginning to forget about black bear season! Pretty soon the Adirondacks will open up their early black bear season and hopefully a few lucky hunters will be able to take a hefty bruin.

I’m no expert when it comes to bear hunting, but this guy is huge! I don’t think I would hesitate to release my arrow on a big bear like that. I’m still on the fence about going this season, but I might make a good long weekend trip to bear hunt again this season and try my luck.

Seems like black bear are just as lazy as deer and would rather walk through a hole in the fence – or rock wall in this case – than go around it or over it.

Not a black bear, but this was a cool pic of a coyote and some pups. That’s a pretty vicious looking snarl, I wouldn’t want to be the pup that upset mom!

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Bear Hunting

New York’s First Early Black Bear Season a Success

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A flourishing black bear population and a newly established early-season give hunters additional opportunities to hunt black bears in New York.

The NYS DEC took a proactive approach to manage the State’s black bear population with the addition of an early black bear season in select WMUs for 2014. The early bear hunting season started on September 6th in portions of Southeastern New York and September 13th in Northern New York

Some of the highlights of the new plan include:

  • New early firearms bear season from September 6-21 in WMUs 3A, 3C, 3H, 3J, 3K, 3M, 3P, 3R, 4P, and 4R. Any hunting implement, including crossbows, are legal for use during the early black bear season.
  • Expanded bear hunting in northern New York which now includes WMUs 6A, 6G, 6K, and 6N. In these newly opened units, bear hunting begins with bowhunting equipment only from September 13 through October 17.

The downside with the early season bear hunting is the heat – the opening day had temperatures in the mid to high 80s with high humidity. Bear hunters will have to skin their harvest as quickly as possible to cool the meat and prevent spoilage. Hunters might also want to skin and quarter the bear in the field and picking out the meat in game bags.

Here’s a video from one successful hunter during this year’s early black bear season:

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Bear Hunting

Black Bears Around Campsites and Hiking Trails

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Recently, the NYS DEC issued some warnings about camping in areas with black bears. I frequently visit areas like this and it’s good to refresh yourself no matter how seasoned of a backpacker, hiker, or camper you are. Here are some tips from the DEC to remember while camping and hiking in bear country:

  • Store food, toiletries and garbage in bear resistant containers or “food hangs.” If you have no choice but to hang your food, be sure to use a dark colored cord. The cord should be 75 feet long and the bag should be hung 15 feet above the ground and at least 10 feet away from trees.
  • Keep food in hangs or in bear resistant container at all times, take down only what is needed for cooking. Bear resistant canisters are a highly effective means for preventing bears from getting food, toiletries and garbage from back country campers. For more information about bear resistant containers, see the DEC webpage at www.dec.ny.gov/animals/7225.html.
  • Bear resistant containers are required to be used by all overnight campers within the Eastern High Peaks Wilderness Zone of the Adirondack Forest Preserve.
  • Never leave food unattended unless it is in a bear resistant container or in a food hang.
  • Never cook or eat in your sleeping area.
  • Cook early, no later than 5 p.m.

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Bear Hunting

Maine Black Bear Raffle

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This was something I came across that you don’t quite hear about everyday, but I thought it was worth mentioning and spreading the word about.In the little town of North Berwick, Maine, 200 Noble High School students are trying to raise $100,000 for a school music trip down to New York City. However, selling cup cakes just wasn’t cutting it so one of the student’s grandfather decided to offer up a raffle for a 6-day black bear hunt.

Grandfather of a choral student in the school music department and a Master Maine Guide, Varney figured the sale of $10 tickets for a chance to hunt at one of his son’s 50 “bear sites” might help raise the funds needed for the children to make the trip.

The winner gets lodging and meals for two at one of the family’s bear camps in northwestern Maine for the first week of the 2008 bear-hunting season. Hot and cold running water, “a flush toilet,” bedding and meals — including a lobster bake and “trash can turkey” dinner — are included. A Ragged Lake Guide Service guide is part of the prize and winners are warned their cell phones won’t work at the remote camp.

Winners who don’t want to hunt can photograph bears and other wildlife in the remote area between Mt. Katahdin and the Canadian border, said Varney, or take $1,000 cash.

Tickets will be sold until April 30 and the winner drawn May 1. Rod and gun clubs are getting out the word and Noble music boosters will be selling tickets at the Kittery Trading Post on Feb. 2.

To purchase tickets for the Black bear hunt raffle, or more information send inquires to Varney at noblesro@sad60.k12.me.us.

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Partnering Up in Response to Coyote Attacks – NY Bowhunter

Bowhunting News

Partnering Up in Response to Coyote Attacks

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Two young children were attacked by coyotes in the community of Rye, New York, in southeastern Westchester County earlier this month. Fortunately both children, age 3 and 6, only sustained minor injuries.

Local authorities, working with DEC, immediately took measures to capture and destroy coyotes in the areas where the attacks occurred. While coyote attacks on people are unusual, there is growing concern that coyotes are becoming too habituated to people in developed areas, leading to altered behavior and potential attacks of both people and pets.

“DEC has been studying coyote ecology and behavior in Westchester County for several years, and it is clear that coyotes are here to stay”

They are well adapted to many environments, including urban and suburban habitats, and they now live in all areas of New York, except Long Island (read more about New York’s suburban coyote study at www.nycoyote.org).

DEC has also developed guidelines for avoiding conflicts with people, and first and foremost, no one should ever attempt to feed or get close to a coyote. If a coyote is seen close to people, pets, or homes, it should be scared away by throwing hard objects, and yelling. Given the adaptive nature of this species children should have adult supervision when outdoors. See DEC’s web-site for more information on avoiding coyote conflicts.

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Bowhunting News

How to Shoot a Compound Bow Properly – Ultimate Guide

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Shooting a compound bow might seem as simple as picking up the bow, drawing the string with an arrow, and releasing it. If that’s how you think it works, then you’re dead wrong. It takes a world of knowledge and practice to learn how to properly shoot a compound bow. Luckily for you, we’re going to teach you how to do it with this compound bow shooting tutorial.

Preparing the Bow

Your compound bow should use high-quality strings that aren’t worn or heavily used. Your bow should be in good shape and properly maintained. You should be aware of how much draw pressure your bow can handle. If possible, use a compound bow that you’ve used before and that you’re familiar with, or use a compound bow that an expert archer has provided. Ideally, you should learn how to shoot a compound bow from someone who has a lot of experience shooting such a bow successfully.

Stance

You should face the target at about a 45-degree angle. Your feet should be parallel to one another and about 17-25 inches apart. Your toes should be directly facing the target. If you use such a stance you’ll have a much easier time drawing your bow and you’ll have a better chance of hitting your target dead-on.

Grip

Use a firm but relaxed grip with your bow-holding hand. If your grip is too tight on the bow then you won’t have as much accuracy on your shot. Try using a wrist sling if you are unable to master the art of a firm yet comfortable grip. Don’t be ashamed because the main point is accuracy and whatever you can do to attain the perfect shot is fine. Never, and I repeat NEVER, shoot with an open hand. You don’t ever want to grab the bow with your drawing hand during a shot – this is undoubtedly the worst mistake you can make when shooting a compound bow because it can lead to fatal errors.

Anchor

When you draw the string, you should be locking your string hand against the side of your face. This is what’s known as the “anchor” position. The string and your hand will be on the right side of your face, and vice versa if you are left-handed. You can achieve the highest level of archery accuracy by anchoring the string at the corner of your mouth – or under your chin.

Draw

You should extend your bow arm directly toward your target with the string gripped firmly between your fingers… or by using a mechanical release device, if you prefer. Point the bow at the target and pull the string smoothly and firmly. Extend the bow all the way, pull the string back to its maximum point of a full draw, and resist the urge to move the compound bow forward. Make sure that you use a bow that is suited for you because a bow with a draw that is too heavy will destroy your accuracy.

Aim

If you’re using a bow that is equipped with a sight then aiming will be easier, but it still won’t be perfect. Bow sights are good for average shooters, especially if a laser sight is involved. The key to natural aiming is practice. The best archers usually aim slightly above the target (depending on wind conditions) so they can aim while still looking directly at the target.

Release

Your release can determine whether or not your shot hits the mark. You need a smooth release, and you need to relax all of your fingers completely before you release the string for the shot. Even the slightest amount of finger tension can disrupt your aim. If you have a mechanical release aid the shot will be easier because all you have to do is draw, aim, and pull the release trigger for the compound bow. This type of mechanism can fail you, however… if you slap the trigger then the arrow will go astray.

Follow-Through

Just as in golf, the follow-through is extremely important in archery. Why? The arrow has already been released, right? You need to keep aiming until your arrow hits the target. The follow-through is largely a mental thing. You need to see your arrow hitting the target while you are steadily holding your bow. Never lower your bow after the arrow has been released. Stay in formation and hold your position until the arrow hits the target.

Practice

If you want to become an expert at shooting a compound bow then you need to practice. The saying “practice makes perfect” isn’t really true. You need to invoke the saying of “perfect practice makes perfect” because practicing something the wrong way will get you nowhere. When your target of choice is out of season then you shouldn’t lay back and watch TV until it’s time to hunt again. Set up targets and keep a compound bow in your hands as much as you can.

Conclusion

After reading this article there’s no excuse for becoming an expert compound bow shooter. From choosing the right equipment to shooting correctly there is an equation to correctly shooting a compound bow. Do you have any tips on shooting a compound bow? If so, we’d love to hear from you in the Comments section below.

Continue Reading

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NYS DEC Misses the Mark with New Regulations

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New changes are heading our way for the 2015 deer season in New York. For those of us hunting in Westchester County and a few other WMUs that have historically had an overpopulation of deer we now have a newly created 2-week long antlerless-only season – the only problem is that it’s the first 2-weeks of bow season.

For some, that’s not an issue, but to others, it just crushed their chances of killing that buck they’ve been patterning since the season ended in 2014. Why? Because those first 2-weeks also happen to be the last few days you can catch a buck on its summer pattern.

The DEC says that management goals are not being met in these WMUs which is why we need the antlerless-only season. Well, I can tell you changing the first two weeks to antlerless-only is going to have a minimal impact, if any, on the antlerless harvest. The guys that want to shoot bucks will be spending their time in NJ or CT and the rest of us, well, we kill does all season long so it’s business as usual for us.

If the DEC really wanted to increase the antlerless harvest we could have looked to our neighbors over in CT and simply extended the hunting season for another month by starting in September, extending into January or both.

We also are still a 2-buck state (1 Regular Season buck tag, 1 Either Sex archery tag). If we dropped one of the tags, like most of the ‘big-buck’ states, and became a 1-buck state I think you’d also see the antlerless harvest go up…not to mention we’d probably have a few more decent bucks running around.

Time will tell how these new regulations end up working, but I think we already know, this isn’t going to work.

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NYS DEC Misses the Mark with New Regulations

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First meeting of 2014 for the WCBA

The Westchester County Bowhunters Association will hold its winter meeting on January 21,2014 at 7:00 p.m. at the Teatown Lake Reservation Ossining, NY.

One of the hot topics for discussion I’m sure will be the plans that Teatown has for using sharpshooters to cull 75 deer from the reservation property. Why Teatown isn’t using a free resource like Westchester County’s own bowhunters and is choosing to use taxpayer money to hire sharp shooters is beyond me. Hopefully, we get some answers on this Tuesday night.

About the WCBA: Since 1979, the Westchester County Bowhunters Association has worked at expanding the knowledge of local non-hunters in order that they understand the importance of sound wildlife conservation, and by that we mean effectively controlling Westchester County’s deer populations through Bow hunting.

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NWTF New York Announces 2010 Funding – NY Bowhunter

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NWTF New York Announces 2010 Funding

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EDGEFIELD, S.C. – The National Wild Turkey Federation’s New York State Chapter budgeted $133,000 from its state Hunting Heritage Super Fund to invest in outreach, education, conservation and other projects in 2010.

The NWTF Super Fund is administered jointly by the NWTF, its state and provincial chapters and wildlife agencies, and supports conservation and education programs.

“The New York State Chapter has been a leader among NWTF chapters since its inception 35 years ago,” said James Earl Kennamer, Ph.D., the NWTF’s chief conservation officer. “By directing dollars to land access and wildlife habitat improvements, and strengthening outreach and education programs, the New York State Chapter is helping enhance habitat for all kinds of wildlife while making a better outdoor experience, not just for hunters – but for everyone. These members are creating a lasting legacy for people to enjoy our rich wildlife heritage.”

Since 1985, NWTF chapters in New York have raised and spent more than $1.7 million on wildlife habitat enhancements, land purchases, education, outreach and more within the state. NWTF chapters and cooperating partners across North America have raised and spent more than $306 million upholding hunting traditions and conserving 14 million acres of wildlife habitat.

“The Congressional Sportsmen’s Foundation reports that hunters in the Empire State spend $788 million and 9.4 million days afield pursuing their sport each year”

Hunters also make significant contributions to the state’s economy. The Congressional Sportsmen’s Foundation reports that hunters in the Empire State spend $788 million and 9.4 million days afield pursuing their sport each year.

The NWTF’s New York State Board of Directors dedicated $133,000 to accomplish the following Hunting Heritage Super Fund projects in 2010, which will benefit New York’s resident and non-resident sportsmen:

* $70,000 to increase access to hunting land through the More Places to Hunt initiative, improve wildlife habitat through the NWTF Seed Subsidy membership benefit and Conservation Seed program, and complete cooperative public land habitat improvement projects that will enhance wild turkey brood habitat and control noxious weeds. Projects will be completed in the Carlton Hill and Deer Creek Marsh wildlife management areas (WMA), and projects in the Tassell Hill State Forest, Louise Keir WMA and Finger Lakes National Forest are under consideration.

* $23,700 to uphold outdoor traditions through the NWTF’s JAKES (Juniors Acquiring Knowledge, Ethics and Sportsmanship) and Wheelin’ Sportsmen NWTF outreach programs, educational programs, scholarship programs, 4-H Shooting Sports, and the National Archery in the Schools Program

* $6,000 to support critical research on wild turkey harvest potential in New York and support of ongoing American chestnut research

* $3,000 to protect and promote our hunting heritage through contributions to the New York State Conservation Council, U.S. Sportsmen’s Alliance and New York State Legislative Sportsmen Caucus

In addition, the New York State Chapter’s board of directors allocated $30,300 to other projects in 2010.

The NWTF is a nonprofit conservation organization that works daily to further its mission of conserving the wild turkey and preserving our hunting heritage.

Through dynamic partnerships with state, federal and provincial wildlife agencies, the NWTF and its members have helped restore wild turkey populations across the country, spending more than $306 million to conserve 14 million acres of habitat for all types of wildlife.

Contact:
Shannon Coggin at (803) 637-7643

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How to Shoot a Compound Bow Properly – Ultimate Guide

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Shooting a compound bow might seem as simple as picking up the bow, drawing the string with an arrow, and releasing it. If that’s how you think it works, then you’re dead wrong. It takes a world of knowledge and practice to learn how to properly shoot a compound bow. Luckily for you, we’re going to teach you how to do it with this compound bow shooting tutorial.

Preparing the Bow

Your compound bow should use high-quality strings that aren’t worn or heavily used. Your bow should be in good shape and properly maintained. You should be aware of how much draw pressure your bow can handle. If possible, use a compound bow that you’ve used before and that you’re familiar with, or use a compound bow that an expert archer has provided. Ideally, you should learn how to shoot a compound bow from someone who has a lot of experience shooting such a bow successfully.

Stance

You should face the target at about a 45-degree angle. Your feet should be parallel to one another and about 17-25 inches apart. Your toes should be directly facing the target. If you use such a stance you’ll have a much easier time drawing your bow and you’ll have a better chance of hitting your target dead-on.

Grip

Use a firm but relaxed grip with your bow-holding hand. If your grip is too tight on the bow then you won’t have as much accuracy on your shot. Try using a wrist sling if you are unable to master the art of a firm yet comfortable grip. Don’t be ashamed because the main point is accuracy and whatever you can do to attain the perfect shot is fine. Never, and I repeat NEVER, shoot with an open hand. You don’t ever want to grab the bow with your drawing hand during a shot – this is undoubtedly the worst mistake you can make when shooting a compound bow because it can lead to fatal errors.

Anchor

When you draw the string, you should be locking your string hand against the side of your face. This is what’s known as the “anchor” position. The string and your hand will be on the right side of your face, and vice versa if you are left-handed. You can achieve the highest level of archery accuracy by anchoring the string at the corner of your mouth – or under your chin.

Draw

You should extend your bow arm directly toward your target with the string gripped firmly between your fingers… or by using a mechanical release device, if you prefer. Point the bow at the target and pull the string smoothly and firmly. Extend the bow all the way, pull the string back to its maximum point of a full draw, and resist the urge to move the compound bow forward. Make sure that you use a bow that is suited for you because a bow with a draw that is too heavy will destroy your accuracy.

Aim

If you’re using a bow that is equipped with a sight then aiming will be easier, but it still won’t be perfect. Bow sights are good for average shooters, especially if a laser sight is involved. The key to natural aiming is practice. The best archers usually aim slightly above the target (depending on wind conditions) so they can aim while still looking directly at the target.

Release

Your release can determine whether or not your shot hits the mark. You need a smooth release, and you need to relax all of your fingers completely before you release the string for the shot. Even the slightest amount of finger tension can disrupt your aim. If you have a mechanical release aid the shot will be easier because all you have to do is draw, aim, and pull the release trigger for the compound bow. This type of mechanism can fail you, however… if you slap the trigger then the arrow will go astray.

Follow-Through

Just as in golf, the follow-through is extremely important in archery. Why? The arrow has already been released, right? You need to keep aiming until your arrow hits the target. The follow-through is largely a mental thing. You need to see your arrow hitting the target while you are steadily holding your bow. Never lower your bow after the arrow has been released. Stay in formation and hold your position until the arrow hits the target.

Practice

If you want to become an expert at shooting a compound bow then you need to practice. The saying “practice makes perfect” isn’t really true. You need to invoke the saying of “perfect practice makes perfect” because practicing something the wrong way will get you nowhere. When your target of choice is out of season then you shouldn’t lay back and watch TV until it’s time to hunt again. Set up targets and keep a compound bow in your hands as much as you can.

Conclusion

After reading this article there’s no excuse for becoming an expert compound bow shooter. From choosing the right equipment to shooting correctly there is an equation to correctly shooting a compound bow. Do you have any tips on shooting a compound bow? If so, we’d love to hear from you in the Comments section below.

Continue Reading

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NYS DEC Misses the Mark with New Regulations

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New changes are heading our way for the 2015 deer season in New York. For those of us hunting in Westchester County and a few other WMUs that have historically had an overpopulation of deer we now have a newly created 2-week long antlerless-only season – the only problem is that it’s the first 2-weeks of bow season.

For some, that’s not an issue, but to others, it just crushed their chances of killing that buck they’ve been patterning since the season ended in 2014. Why? Because those first 2-weeks also happen to be the last few days you can catch a buck on its summer pattern.

The DEC says that management goals are not being met in these WMUs which is why we need the antlerless-only season. Well, I can tell you changing the first two weeks to antlerless-only is going to have a minimal impact, if any, on the antlerless harvest. The guys that want to shoot bucks will be spending their time in NJ or CT and the rest of us, well, we kill does all season long so it’s business as usual for us.

If the DEC really wanted to increase the antlerless harvest we could have looked to our neighbors over in CT and simply extended the hunting season for another month by starting in September, extending into January or both.

We also are still a 2-buck state (1 Regular Season buck tag, 1 Either Sex archery tag). If we dropped one of the tags, like most of the ‘big-buck’ states, and became a 1-buck state I think you’d also see the antlerless harvest go up…not to mention we’d probably have a few more decent bucks running around.

Time will tell how these new regulations end up working, but I think we already know, this isn’t going to work.

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NYS DEC Misses the Mark with New Regulations

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First meeting of 2014 for the WCBA

The Westchester County Bowhunters Association will hold its winter meeting on January 21,2014 at 7:00 p.m. at the Teatown Lake Reservation Ossining, NY.

One of the hot topics for discussion I’m sure will be the plans that Teatown has for using sharpshooters to cull 75 deer from the reservation property. Why Teatown isn’t using a free resource like Westchester County’s own bowhunters and is choosing to use taxpayer money to hire sharp shooters is beyond me. Hopefully, we get some answers on this Tuesday night.

About the WCBA: Since 1979, the Westchester County Bowhunters Association has worked at expanding the knowledge of local non-hunters in order that they understand the importance of sound wildlife conservation, and by that we mean effectively controlling Westchester County’s deer populations through Bow hunting.

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New York Bowhunters, Inc. Receives “Presidents Award” – NY Bowhunter

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New York Bowhunters, Inc. Receives “Presidents Award”

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(6/24/2010) Canandaigua, NY – New York Bowhunters, Inc. (NYB) was presented the prestigious New York State Conservation Council’s (NYSCC) 2009 Presidents Award at that organizations annual meeting this past fall.

The NYSCC Presidents award is selected by the NYSCC President and is given to an outstanding club or organization annually. NYB 1st Vice President, Martin Seeley was contacted by Harold Palmer, the 2009 NYSCC President and told about the accomplishment.

During the presentation ceremony, President Palmer stated “Much of my decision about the award was because of NYB’s work with the youth and the youth camps that they have held in our state since 1993.” Palmer then proceeded to detail NYB’s other accomplishments, including their assistance with setting up archery ranges in Iraq for our servicemen and women serving there, NYB’s annual veterans hunt for wounded soldiers, NYB’s physically challenged program and their creation of an adaptive equipment CD entitled “Adaptive Equipment for the Physically Challenged and Aging Bowhunter”. Palmer also recognized NYB for receiving the Pope and Young Club’s Stewardship Award in 2009.

“New York Bowhunters, Inc. was recognized among our peers by the largest sportsmen’s organization in New York State”

Seeley stated “Winning this award was truly an honor. NYB was recognized among our peers by the largest sportsmen’s organization in New York State (NYS). Winning the NYSCC Presidents Award would not have been possible if not for the hard working, caring, selfless men and women who volunteer their valuable time and efforts to help run NYB’s volunteer programs each year.” Seeley continued, “I would like to thank Harold Palmer and the NYSCC for their acknowledgment of NYB’s hard work and for their continued work on behalf of the sportsmen of NYS.”

NYB has put over 1,400 campers through their free summer youth camp program. They have worked with the New York State Department of Environment Conservation (DEC) and the towns of Irwin and Irondequoit NY to establish successful urban deer management programs in both townships and have worked with hundreds of physically challenged bowhunters helping them to enjoy the sport of bowhunting.

New York Bowhunters, Inc. was formed in 1991 to promote bowhunting, educate hunters and non-hunters, and to fight anti-hunting legislation. NYB is currently working to regain the bowhunting time lost by southern zone bowhunters during the DEC’s 2005 season restructuring. The organization would like the southern zone early archery season to start annually on October 1st.

NYB can be contacted at P.O. Box 1157, Canandaigua, NY 14424 or by phone at 585-905-0961 or through email at nyboffice@newyorkbowhunters.com. To learn more about NYB, their existing programs or to become a member, please go to our website at http://www.newyorkbowhunters.com/

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How to Shoot a Compound Bow Properly – Ultimate Guide

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Shooting a compound bow might seem as simple as picking up the bow, drawing the string with an arrow, and releasing it. If that’s how you think it works, then you’re dead wrong. It takes a world of knowledge and practice to learn how to properly shoot a compound bow. Luckily for you, we’re going to teach you how to do it with this compound bow shooting tutorial.

Preparing the Bow

Your compound bow should use high-quality strings that aren’t worn or heavily used. Your bow should be in good shape and properly maintained. You should be aware of how much draw pressure your bow can handle. If possible, use a compound bow that you’ve used before and that you’re familiar with, or use a compound bow that an expert archer has provided. Ideally, you should learn how to shoot a compound bow from someone who has a lot of experience shooting such a bow successfully.

Stance

You should face the target at about a 45-degree angle. Your feet should be parallel to one another and about 17-25 inches apart. Your toes should be directly facing the target. If you use such a stance you’ll have a much easier time drawing your bow and you’ll have a better chance of hitting your target dead-on.

Grip

Use a firm but relaxed grip with your bow-holding hand. If your grip is too tight on the bow then you won’t have as much accuracy on your shot. Try using a wrist sling if you are unable to master the art of a firm yet comfortable grip. Don’t be ashamed because the main point is accuracy and whatever you can do to attain the perfect shot is fine. Never, and I repeat NEVER, shoot with an open hand. You don’t ever want to grab the bow with your drawing hand during a shot – this is undoubtedly the worst mistake you can make when shooting a compound bow because it can lead to fatal errors.

Anchor

When you draw the string, you should be locking your string hand against the side of your face. This is what’s known as the “anchor” position. The string and your hand will be on the right side of your face, and vice versa if you are left-handed. You can achieve the highest level of archery accuracy by anchoring the string at the corner of your mouth – or under your chin.

Draw

You should extend your bow arm directly toward your target with the string gripped firmly between your fingers… or by using a mechanical release device, if you prefer. Point the bow at the target and pull the string smoothly and firmly. Extend the bow all the way, pull the string back to its maximum point of a full draw, and resist the urge to move the compound bow forward. Make sure that you use a bow that is suited for you because a bow with a draw that is too heavy will destroy your accuracy.

Aim

If you’re using a bow that is equipped with a sight then aiming will be easier, but it still won’t be perfect. Bow sights are good for average shooters, especially if a laser sight is involved. The key to natural aiming is practice. The best archers usually aim slightly above the target (depending on wind conditions) so they can aim while still looking directly at the target.

Release

Your release can determine whether or not your shot hits the mark. You need a smooth release, and you need to relax all of your fingers completely before you release the string for the shot. Even the slightest amount of finger tension can disrupt your aim. If you have a mechanical release aid the shot will be easier because all you have to do is draw, aim, and pull the release trigger for the compound bow. This type of mechanism can fail you, however… if you slap the trigger then the arrow will go astray.

Follow-Through

Just as in golf, the follow-through is extremely important in archery. Why? The arrow has already been released, right? You need to keep aiming until your arrow hits the target. The follow-through is largely a mental thing. You need to see your arrow hitting the target while you are steadily holding your bow. Never lower your bow after the arrow has been released. Stay in formation and hold your position until the arrow hits the target.

Practice

If you want to become an expert at shooting a compound bow then you need to practice. The saying “practice makes perfect” isn’t really true. You need to invoke the saying of “perfect practice makes perfect” because practicing something the wrong way will get you nowhere. When your target of choice is out of season then you shouldn’t lay back and watch TV until it’s time to hunt again. Set up targets and keep a compound bow in your hands as much as you can.

Conclusion

After reading this article there’s no excuse for becoming an expert compound bow shooter. From choosing the right equipment to shooting correctly there is an equation to correctly shooting a compound bow. Do you have any tips on shooting a compound bow? If so, we’d love to hear from you in the Comments section below.

Continue Reading

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NYS DEC Misses the Mark with New Regulations

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New changes are heading our way for the 2015 deer season in New York. For those of us hunting in Westchester County and a few other WMUs that have historically had an overpopulation of deer we now have a newly created 2-week long antlerless-only season – the only problem is that it’s the first 2-weeks of bow season.

For some, that’s not an issue, but to others, it just crushed their chances of killing that buck they’ve been patterning since the season ended in 2014. Why? Because those first 2-weeks also happen to be the last few days you can catch a buck on its summer pattern.

The DEC says that management goals are not being met in these WMUs which is why we need the antlerless-only season. Well, I can tell you changing the first two weeks to antlerless-only is going to have a minimal impact, if any, on the antlerless harvest. The guys that want to shoot bucks will be spending their time in NJ or CT and the rest of us, well, we kill does all season long so it’s business as usual for us.

If the DEC really wanted to increase the antlerless harvest we could have looked to our neighbors over in CT and simply extended the hunting season for another month by starting in September, extending into January or both.

We also are still a 2-buck state (1 Regular Season buck tag, 1 Either Sex archery tag). If we dropped one of the tags, like most of the ‘big-buck’ states, and became a 1-buck state I think you’d also see the antlerless harvest go up…not to mention we’d probably have a few more decent bucks running around.

Time will tell how these new regulations end up working, but I think we already know, this isn’t going to work.

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NYS DEC Misses the Mark with New Regulations

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First meeting of 2014 for the WCBA

The Westchester County Bowhunters Association will hold its winter meeting on January 21,2014 at 7:00 p.m. at the Teatown Lake Reservation Ossining, NY.

One of the hot topics for discussion I’m sure will be the plans that Teatown has for using sharpshooters to cull 75 deer from the reservation property. Why Teatown isn’t using a free resource like Westchester County’s own bowhunters and is choosing to use taxpayer money to hire sharp shooters is beyond me. Hopefully, we get some answers on this Tuesday night.

About the WCBA: Since 1979, the Westchester County Bowhunters Association has worked at expanding the knowledge of local non-hunters in order that they understand the importance of sound wildlife conservation, and by that we mean effectively controlling Westchester County’s deer populations through Bow hunting.

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New Year, New Season – NY Bowhunter

Archery Tips

New Year, New Season

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Well the new year is finally arriving and with it brings new hunting seasons and more opportunities to get out into the field and keep that bow in good use.

In Connecticut, there is still one more month to bow hunt whitetails, but I’m afraid I most likely will not be participating because funds are tight right now. This does not mean there will be no more hunting for me though, in fact, now is one of my favorite seasons to bowhunt! There are plenty of opportunities in New York for me to take my bow out and hunt small game like cottontail rabbits, squirrels, and try my luck on some red foxes and coyotes.

The key to successful deer hunting is to practice with your bow all year long. That being said, it’s much more enjoyable to shoot at game than it is to shoot at a target. Hunting predators with a bow is a great challenge by anyone’s standards, but the rewards are well worth the effort and, not to mention, you’re also helping save a few deer by shooting some coyotes.

I prefer to hunt coyotes from a tree stand. This keeps my scent above the coyote’s keen nose, puts me out of sight, and allows me to draw my bow back without getting the attention of that wily coyote. A climbing stand is a must for this type of hunting since you will be switching locations roughly every hour or so. I like to set up and start calling with a cottontail screamer call for about 15 minutes and then quiet up for another 15 minutes. I repeat this process four times and if nothing comes in by the 4th time I climb down, move about 500 yards or so to another location and start the process again.

It takes a bit of work, but the rewards are well worth it for both you and the deer herd. Don’t put that bow away yet this season, get out and shoot some coyotes! It’s great fun and a good way to stay outdoors.

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Keep Your Bowhunting Skills Sharp with 3D Shooting

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Over the last few weekends we’ve been headed over to Blue Mountain Sportsman Center to shoot 3D. The course has been a lot of fun to shoot. There’s several targets to shoot at including deer, turkey, bear, and fox. The terrain makes it very realistic practice for hunting with shots at inclines and declines to simulate actual hunting scenarios.

One thing I like to do is shoot from the furthest stakes and guess the yardage. Then after we all shoot we range the target to see how close we were to guessing the distance. This really helps me to learn how to judge distance in the field and is a valuable tool for when an animal catches you off guard in the field. Shooting from the furthest stakes also make the closer shots seem easier.

If you haven’t been out shooting 3D this summer then you better hurry up and get out there because hunting season will be here before you know it. Blue Mountain Sportsman Center is open Thursday – Sunday and holidays. Shooting a round of 3D costs $12 with a county park pass and is $15 without a park pass.

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Indoor Archery Leagues at Extreme Archery

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Team NYB will be joining the Hunter League at Extreme Archery set to begin on September 3rd. The Hunter League will be held on Fridays for 6 weeks and feature various animal targets.

We’re looking forward to participating in the league and sharpening our skills for the upcoming season. The indoor league is a great way to meet fellow archers and practice shooting under a little bit of pressure!

Here are the details on the Indoor Archery Leagues at Extreme Archery:

Kids League ($70, 8 weeks)
– begins Saturday, September 4th @ 10:00am

300 Target League ($90, 7 weeks)
– begins Wednesday, September 1st @ 6:30pm

Hunter League ($90, 6 weeks)
– begins Friday, September 3rd @ 6:30pm

Traditional League (TBD)
– call to find out more

To sign up for any of the Indoor Archery Leagues call Extreme Archery at 914-777-7500.

Extreme Archery is located at 801 East Boston Post Rd, Mamaroneck, NY 10543.

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How to Set the Perfect Treestand

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This is something new I’m adding to my arsenal of tricks this season to help me set the perfect stand (works for trail cams too)! It’s called the Photographer’s Ephemeris, a tool designed to help landscape photographers take the perfect picture at sunrise or sunset.

The tool allows you to pick a location, date and time to see exactly where the sun and moon will be. This allows you to follow the path of the sun and moon on any given date and at any given time.

So how does this help the hunter? Simple. It allows the hunter to find a stand location on the map and then see how the sun will rise and set during the hunting season so that the sun is never in the hunter’s eyes.

I entered the location of our lease in the program and changed the date to opening day. Where we have our stands situated is in the perfect spot with the sun rising to our right and circling behind us before setting to our left. That means if the deer are out in the hunting plot where we hope to shoot them we will have the sun behind us which will make it much harder for the deer to pick us out of the tree.

This is a great tool I will be playing around with more and more this season as I hang some tree stands over the next few weeks. Below is a video on how it works:

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Late Season Chasing Brings Big Bucks Down – NY Bowhunter

Deer Hunting

Late Season Chasing Brings Big Bucks Down

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Joe and I hunted hard all season long and time after time had hunts ruined by weather, coyotes or the “quad guys” as we called them. Last season we saw several deer each time we went afield and this season was drastically different.

The deer sightings dropped off and hunting these elusive bucks was extremely difficult. I only saw one buck while hunting this season that was similar in size to the one pictured above that Joe took on December 19th.

Earlier in the week, Joe set up a new stand in a thicket that funneled the deer off of a mountain. He had witnessed a younger buck breeding and saw some chasing. On Sunday morning he climbed up in his stand and as the day began to break the deer were on their feet moving and this buck made his way towards Joe.

Joe drew back and was able to put a good shot on the buck, watching it go down in sight. It’s a great way to end the season and this is truly a buck to be proud of. It just goes to show you that you can’t ever give up. The season isn’t over until it’s over and there’s always a chance to put your tag on a nice buck.

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Deer Hunting

Crossbow Deer Hunting – The 8 Best Tips & Tactics for Success

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Crossbows are powerful and sensitive pieces of hunting equipment, and it can take years to master the art of crossbow deer hunting. It’s a skill that requires patience, a steady hand and a firm grasp of the concept of aerodynamics. Hunting deer with a rifle is challenging enough but learning how to successfully hunt deer with a crossbow takes things to an entirely new level. Below we’ve broken down the eight best tips and tactics for hunters who want to improve their crossbow hunting skills.

1. Know the law

Hunting regulations can be difficult to understand and adding crossbows to the mix only complicates matters. After you learn that crossbows, in general, are permitted you should determine if there are any equipment restrictions.

Next, you need to find out exactly when they are permitted and specifically how they are to be used. Many states have head and minimum draw requirements. If you can’t find any specific information on crossbow deer hunting in your state then look for generic archery regulations and talk to other hunters who use crossbows for hunting deer.

2. Stay ethical

Ethical crossbow hunting means displaying respect for yourself, nature, the deer and other individuals (whether or not they are hunters). Avoid hunting fawns as they will keep deer populations healthy for future generations. Don’t kill simply for sport – use as much of the animal as possible and always try to make a clean kill. Only hunt in season and avoid trespassing or using illegal baits to lure deer to you. Sticking to “fair chase” rules is what makes hunting an honorable pastime.

3. Practice, practice, practice

Your crossbow shouldn’t be collecting dust when deer are out of season. These deadly devices can be catastrophic in the wrong hands so you should practice consistently year-round. Attend archery classes and engage in target practice with fellow crossbow hunters on a regular basis. Staying in shape and in practice all year will make you a safer and more accurate hunter when a deer crosses your line of sight.

4. Make safety your primary concern

An arrow through the head is only entertaining when it’s nothing more than a novelty hat. Your crossbow’s safety should always be on until you have a clear shot. As is the case with guns, with crossbows you should never point the bow at anyone or anything that you aren’t preparing to shoot, and you should always be aware of what is on the other side of your target.

You should always have a well-stocked first aid kit on hand that includes bandages, gauze, scissors, eye wash, smelling salts, alcohol wipes, sterile pads, latex gloves, aspirin, medical tape, a tourniquet, blister pads and hydrocortisone or another type of cream to soothe cuts or insect bites. Keep a fully-charged cell or satellite phone handy too, in case you need to call for help.

5. Select the proper bow and arrow combination

Deer hunting will require you to use a crossbow with a draw of 75-125 pounds. Certain areas have draw requirements for specific types of game so be sure to look into that before choosing a bow. The draw weight determines the speed of the arrow when it is released.

Many crossbows are outfitted with dampeners and scopes, but you can also buy aftermarket parts and add them to your bow. Crossbows are available in different materials, and as a general rule crossbows that are more lightweight and silent cost more.

Arrow selection is of the utmost importance. Arrows are usually made of aluminum, carbon or a composite of both of these materials. Aluminum arrows are more precise, but they are not as durable as carbon or composite arrows. Inexperienced hunters will likely want to start off with carbon arrows and work their way up to the more accurate yet more fragile aluminum arrows. You might also want to look into full metal jacket arrows, which are more expensive but are known for being deadly accurate, fast and durable. Most arrows are between 15-23 inches long and you should check the crossbow manufacturer’s recommendations to make sure you use arrows of an appropriate length.

6. Take advantage of modern technology

You can add equipment to your bow or carry certain tools with you that will aid your crossbow deer hunting efforts. Use a scope sight because even though many crossbows have open sights a scope sight will greatly increase your accuracy. Rangefinders are also extremely useful for crossbow hunters as they can tell you the exact distance from you to the target with just the click of a button.

You might also want to invest in a cocking device to make bringing the bow to full draw easier on yourself. Another tip that expert crossbow hunters recommend is to use a rest. You can also use shooting sticks or a pod to give the bow more stability and take some of the work-load off your arms.

7. Care for your gear

Your arrows need to be sharpened before each hunt. You should also keep an eye on your strings and cables as they can wear easily and need to be replaced regularly. Caring for your gear also means keeping everything clean and organized when you aren’t hunting. This guideline doesn’t just apply to your bow and arrows but to every single piece of hunting equipment you use.

8. Remain completely undetectable

Deer are known for their finely-tuned senses of sight, smell, and hearing. Wear as much camouflage as you can, and use rubber boots to avoid leaving behind scents that could be picked up. Your clothing should be washed with scent-free detergent prior to the outing, and you should seal it in a plastic box until you’re ready to hunt. Keep scent eliminator on you at all times and use it on your clothing, gear, tree stands, blinds, and trail camera locations.

Be aware of wind direction and stay downwind of potential targets. Keep movement and noise to a minimum at all times, and have your crossbow cocked and ready so you are fully prepared to take the shot when an opportunity presents itself.

Conclusion

There is no feeling like successfully bagging a big buck with a perfectly-placed arrow from a crossbow. We hope you found these eight crossbow deer hunting tips, tricks and tactics helpful. What strategies do you employ to give yourself a better shot at success with a crossbow? We’d love to hear your suggestions, questions and other remarks regarding this topic in the Comments here at NYBowhunter.com.

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Deer Hunting

7 Best Tips for How to Adjust & Sight a Crossbow Scope

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Shooting an arrow from a bow isn’t as easy as they make it look in the movies. Even once you’ve mastered drawing the crossbow, you still have to focus on things like adjustments, sights, arrow material, bow strength, and arrow size. In this article we’ll break down the 7 best tips for how to adjust and sight a crossbow.

1. Adjusting Your Crossbow Scope

You should shoot 500-1000 arrows before you attempt to sight your scope. If you can’t shoot tightly grouped arrows and your grouping is off then you aren’t ready to use sight. When you add a scope, follow the manufacturer’s directions. The dot at the top of the scope represents 20 yards out.  The middle and lower dots represent 30 yards, respectively. The number and type of marks depend on the scope and the crossbow’s intended use. You need to “zero” the top dot, or calibrate it, to ensure that it is set for 20 yards.

Your scope should have a wind adjustment know and an elevation adjustment knob. These knobs allow you to adjust the scope depending on height and wind conditions. Each adjustment is followed by a “clicking” sound, which represents a ¼” adjustment at a 100-yard distance, and the other click represents a 1/20” adjustment at a range of 20 yards.

To sight your crossbow, you need to make sure that the weapon does not move at all during firing. Stands 20 yards from your target. Shoot the target using the top reticle three times, and just barely pull the trigger to avoid moving the crossbow. Repeat this action three times. Depending on where the arrows landed, you might need to remove the protection cape from the scope adjustment knobs. Use a screwdriver to adjust the settings. 20 clicks equal one full inch on the elevation, and counterclockwise  40 clicks equals a 2” change in the scope’s directional pattern.

2. Mounting the Scope

Mounting the scope is relatively easy for most crossbows. It’s simply a matter of clasping the scope onto the gun, making sure it is secure, and making sure it doesn’t interfere with the gun in any way. Scopes can be removed and replaced relatively easily, though you should consider things like size, weight, detection range, night-vision capabilities and more when shopping for a gun scope.

First of all, the gun and scope should be completely clean. The mounting system you choose should be compatible with your rifle. Your scope rings should also be compatible with the device. Mount the scope as low on the rifle as possible. Usually, this is done using Torx keys, Allen wrenches or a screwdriver. Position the scope and tighten the top rings slightly, but leave them lose enough so the scope can move slightly. Make sure the scope is far enough up on the gun that you won’t get any facial recoil. When the scope is in position then tighten the ring screws alternatively for the tightest fit.

3. Know the Different Types of Crossbow Scopes

For all intents and purposes of this article, there are four kinds of crossbow scopes:

  • Single Red Dot Scope – The red dot usually represents 20 years and the crossbow should be heightened or lowered to strike the target.
  • Single Reticle Optical Scope – This scope also has a 20-yard marking, and it’s equipped with crosshairs. Upward crosshair movement equals a longer shot and this type of scope is also used for hunting animals that are on the run.
  • Triple Red Dot Scope – This scope provides you with three points of reference. Apart from the standard 20-yard marker this scope also has 30 and 40-yard markers. In many respects, the markers are simply simulated spots due to factors like elevation, wind, and movement.
  • Multi-Retical Optical Scope – This scope contains horizontal and vertical crosshairs, as well as three points of reference for distance (20, 30, 40 and 50 yards). The higher the crossbow is pointed the scope allows you to track the distance of the target.

4. Parallax & Accuracy

Parallax is often used in astronomy, photography, and 3D math. However, parallax is also extremely important to crossbow hunters. Most of us have two eyes and the two eyes piece together everything and send a single image to your brain. This is why one-eyed shots are preferred. You can buy parallax adjusters, which are extremely important for ling range shooters and snipers.

Accuracy is the name of the game when it comes to crossbow hunting. You want to make a safe, clean kill. Otherwise, you could injure the animal (another hunter) or completely destroy the carcass.

5. Make Sure That All of Your Equipment is in Good Shape

If your scope is of then you’re going to get an incorrect reading every time. Your laser sight should also be calibrated to make sure it’s providing you with the correct distance (new batteries and a reset button usually do the trick). You should also check your bow, strings, arrows, heads and other related equipment to ensure that a possible failure of one system wouldn’t affect the other mechanisms.

6. Wind & Elevation

Snipers aren’t just trained for accuracy in a vacuum – they have to be prepared for changing winds and elevation. If you’ve ever been crossbow hunting then you know that the wind can change at the drop of a hat. You always want to remain downwind from your prey to keep them from catching your scent or noise.

As far as elevation goes, you might be on a flat surface but what about your target and the difference in elevation between you and said target. Train with an expert to learn how to best use wind and elevation to your advantage.

7. Size, Length & Weight

You shouldn’t start off with a giant crossbow without experience. Luckily, crossbows come in many sizes and you can properly learn how to operate these devices at a relatively young age. The length of the arrow is another key point. Arrows that are too large can misfire and damage the bow itself. Arrows that are shorter than the manufacturer’s recommendations can also cause problems, so always be sure to check your owner’s manual and stock up on arrows of the right length. Most standard arrows are between 15 and 22 inches. Additionally, arrowheads can be extremely heavy depending on what they’re made of, and they could crack or break the bow if fired incorrectly. Arrows are usually made of aluminum, carbon, or an alloy of those two products.

When it comes to the arrow, things like weight and size matter, too. A heavy arrow may provide you with greater velocity, but a lighter arrow is easier to shoot but it might not be as accurate. Arrows are usually made of steel, a far cry from the wood and stone arrowheads used centuries ago.

Conclusion

Increasing your target hit rate with a crossbow isn’t as hard as it might seem at first, as long as you follow the 10 aforementioned steps. Not everyone can master the crossbow but there’s no feeling in the world like getting that perfect shot that you’ve been preparing for all season. Which tips do you find the most helpful when adjusting and sighting a crossbow? We’d love to hear your questions and suggestions in the Comment box below.

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Deer Hunting

10 Most Common Bow Hunting Mistakes – How to Correct

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Bowhunting is like golf in a lot of ways. It can be extremely exhilarating or it can be extremely frustrating, and oftentimes it’s both within just a few minutes. If you want to improve your bowhunting skills in order to get more enjoyment out of the sport then maybe you just need to work on something specific that’s common to many bowhunters. Below we’ve listed 10 of the most common bow hunting mistakes, and we will discuss each one in detail to help you improve your results when bowhunting.

  1. Using the Wrong Bow & Arrow Combination – Unfortunately, we see this mistake made far too often. Knowing which arrows (sizewise) and broadheads (weightwise) to combine with a crossbow is as easy as opening Google or the owner’s manual. We’re not sure if it’s impatience, incompetence or a combination of the two but a lot of bow hunting mistakes could be avoided simply by matching the right bow to the correct arrows. Most bow manufacturers provide advice for the type of arrows that should be used and ignoring that advice is counterproductive and unsafe. Make sure that your bow works with carbon fiber, aluminum, and hybrid arrows, and determine the minimum and maximum lengths for each arrow. Additionally, make sure your arrowheads are compatible with the arrow shafts and the bow itself.
  1. Losing Form/Not Practicing Regularly – Legendary football coach Vince Lombardi once said that “practice doesn’t make perfect. Perfect practice makes perfect.” If you aren’t having bow hunting success then maybe all you need to do is practice more – in the right way, and with the proper form. Ask someone who you respect as a bowhunter to give you some guidance, and follow their tips closely. If you notice that they do something that you don’t do then ask them why and try to emulate their form. Even if you have a solid shooting form it can be easy to lose your touch during the off-season, so prevent that from happening by engaging your practice targets regularly.
  1. Overbowing – You gain absolutely nothing by overbowing (using a bow that requires too much draw) and you could potentially be putting yourself and others in danger. Yes, you can achieve a higher arrow velocity with a higher draw. Far too often, though, hunters think they need more velocity when speed isn’t the issue. Bowhunting isn’t about who can pull the tautest bow back the farthest – it’s about successful hits. Anyway, practicing with a heavy draw might seem like a good idea in June but when December comes everything from your fingertips to the arrowhead acts differently. Use as much pressure and velocity as you need, but don’t let your ego take you too far.
  1. Misjudging Distances – If you often think that your arrow is dead on point but it goes flying far or end up short…you’re not alone. Don’t worry, though, because this error can usually be cleared up by improving on your range finding. With time and experience, you’ll become a better judge of distance. Until you learn the ropes, however, there are two tricks to correctly judging the distance from you to the target: rangefinders and pre-ranging. Rangefinders are like digital tape measures that you can attach to your bow.
  1. Improper Shot Placement – Shot placement is a concern for hunters whether the weapon is a bow or a gun; the problem is that bow hunting leaves more room for error. A lot of the shot placement mistakes made in the field have something to do with the #1, #2 and #3 mistakes on this list, but sometimes the issue is simply aiming for the wrong spot or not knowing how to aim. The best spot to hit a deer is about four inches above the first joint that’s below the shoulder. Aiming for a wild hog’s weak spot near the heart will take down these sometimes seemingly invincible animals, while the “middle of the middle” rule works for larger game like elk or bears. If your target is fleet-footed and likely to react to the sound of a bow then you should usually aim for the heart – this will allow you to inflict maximum damage whether or not the animal drops before it sprints.
  1. Getting Trigger-Happy or Waiting Too Long to Shoot – They are exact opposites yet they both cause equally bad results. If you shoot too soon then other animals might get spooked by the sound of the bow, or you might be passing up the opportunity for a perfect kill. If you shoot too late then the animal might have already detected your presence. The key to solving this common bow hunting mistake is being aware of your surroundings. Know the distance and wind conditions. Shoot as soon as you have a clear shot of the area that will do the most damage to vital organs and when you’ve completed a pre-shot checklist.
  1. Choosing the Wrong Location – There are few worse feelings than planning on a major hunt but then spending the entire time waiting. You should use trail cameras to plot out the best spots, and try to figure out where other hunters are heading, if possible. You want to be in the hunting hot spots but you don’t want to be limited by inexperienced hunters or crowded areas. You should set your tree stands ahead of time, and don’t forget to plan your shooting lines and paths. Try to find a location that proves advantageous to you as a bow hunter.
  1. Lack of Stealth – No matter how many times it’s written or spoken about, there is always “that one guy” who is seemingly always bumbling around, failing to use scent eliminator, not having his bow cocked, breaking twigs, and making noise. We call him the “Mr. Magoo” of hunting but the only difference is that the real-life version ruins things for everyone, including himself. Deer can detect a human the way humans can detect a skunk in a suitcase, so take every possible precaution to eliminate all human odors before heading out. Your hat, clothes, boots, tree stand and even your bow should leave no traces of your existence for a deer to find. One advantage of hunting with a bow is that you can shoot while keeping your location undisclosed, but you give up that advantage if you stink or are making noise unnecessarily.
  1. Failure to Arrive Early & Stay Late – The most dedicated hunters are usually the most successful. There is a definite correlation between persistence and achieving a goal, as long as you aren’t failing due to Albert Einstein’s definition of insanity, “doing the same thing over and over again, but expecting different results.” The first days of the hunting season are known as having the highest success rates because the animals have had time to “forget” that the presence of humans can also mean the existence of predators. And late in the season there are fewer hunters in the area so you have a better chance of bagging that big buck everyone’s been talking about for the last few months. You should even use the “arrive early, stay late” philosophy when deciding when to head to the stand and to pack it in.
  1. Overconfidence – No matter how good of a bow hunter you’re considered to be there is always room for improvement. Nature is always ready and willing to humble us when we think we finally “get it” so keep your head small and your broad heads sharp. Whether you think you’ve got the perfect shot or you think your archery skills are unmatchable, hunters consistently make the common mistake of overestimating their skills with a bow and arrow. It feels good when everything goes right, but don’t let that go to your head because the next time you are in a similar situation there is a good chance that things will wind up differently.

Conclusion

Have you been sabotaging your bow hunting efforts with one of the aforementioned common mistakes? If so, we hope we’ve given you some helpful advice on how to rectify the issue. Bow hunting can be frustrating and it can be easy to fall into bad habits, but the goal of this article is to aid you in identifying and correcting problem areas. Use the Comments section below to let us know if you think you might be making bow hunting errors, or if you see people committing a specific bow hunting mistake too often and you’d like us to address it in an article.

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