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Xstand X-1 Treestand [PRODUCT REVIEW] – NY Bowhunter

Product Reviews

Xstand X-1 Treestand [PRODUCT REVIEW]

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PROS: Lightweight at just under 12 pounds, large 31″ x 21″ platform, locking cables, cinch straps to keep the seat from moving when you stand up, cinch straps double as backpack straps, adjustable foot straps, quiet to climb with.

CONS: Flexing arms take a bit of climbing to get used to, platform raises when you sit down and lowers when you stand up because of the flexing arms, the seat is small and the material on the arms and seat can be noisy with sudden movements.

MSRP: $299.00

If you hunt the suburbs like I do it doesn’t take long for you to realize it’s a carry-in/carry-out game. Leave a stand in the woods for too long and it’s gone. That’s the main reason I use climbing treestands to hunt about 95% of the time. An additional benefit of climbing stands is the ability to be mobile and move with the game.

I am always interested to see what’s new with treestands and was excited when I was given an X-1 Treestand to review. The way I look at climbers is you have two types – your bare bones lightweight models that are super quiet and your super comfortable models that tend to be a bit bulkier and noisier to set up and climb with.

The X-1 Treestand is your bare bones lightweight stand that is easy to set-up. The first thing that caught my attention was the fiberglass arms on the stand. The fiberglass arms have a loop in them that the cable runs through. The arms come in towards the tree when you put weight on the stand to ensure a solid grip on the tree and flex outwards as you ease up to allow for easier climbing according to the manufacturer. This was something I had to find out for myself though so I set up the climber and picked a not so perfect tree a climb – after all, these are the real life trees you find in the woods!

The initial set up of the stand was easy. I found it to be quieter than my Summit Viper climber, but not as quiet as my Lone Wolf Alpha Hand Climber. What I really liked about the X-1 Treestand was the locking pins on the side of the stand that secured the cable in place. This made me feel like there was no way the cable was separating from the stand and I knew I was safe.

One thing you will notice with the cable is that there is one stop on the first end and 5 stops on the opposite end. What’s great about this design is if you’re going to be hunting out of the same tree on more than one occasion you don’t have to mess around in the dark to figure out what the correct setting is. Once you know which of the 5 stops to use, simply lock the pin by giving it a few turns and use the end of the cable with the single stop to take your stand off the tree and re-attach it on the next days hunt.

Similar to what you’ll find on a Lone Wolf stand are the two cinch straps on this climber. These are great for when your climbing because if at any point the base becomes disconnected from the tree it’s only going to fall as far as the cinch straps allow which is just about 4 feet. Additionally, when you’ve climbed to your desired height you can sit in the stand and tighten the cinch straps to prevent the stand from moving. I’ve used climbers without these cinch straps and had the seat fall when I stood up and brushed against the side of the seat – that’s the last thing you need when a big buck is working his way into range.

The X-1 Treestand has adjustable foot stirrups on its large 31″ x 21″ platform so you can get a tight fit around your boots and make for an easy climb. I picked a tree that was on the small side of what I would normally climb in the woods and got the stand set up. I attached the seat and then the platform with ease and then connected the cinch straps and gave myself enough slack to climb.

The foot stirrups were easily adjusted to my boots and then I began my climb. I quickly noticed a difference when climbing with this stand as the fiberglass arms flexed as I climbed. The idea behind the fiberglass arms is a good one – it’s supposed to grip the tree tighter when your weight is on the stand and to open up when you take your weight off to help you move the stand up to the next position. However, I felt that the fiberglass arms gave this stand too much play when I was climbing and it was very different from the solid bite I was used to with my other climbers. I don’t think this is necessarily a bad thing, but it was different from what I was used to.

When I reached my desired height I sat down and tightened up the cinch straps. The seat was small, but fairly comfortable although the material seemed a bit noisy and I’d be afraid to move too quickly on a cold November morning and have a deer hear my pants brush the seat. I really liked the openness of the stand. I chose not to connect the included rail that wraps around the front of the stand and felt that no matter which way a deer would come in I’d have a shot at it with my bow.

Overall this is a decent stand that’s lightweight and great for the bowhunter. It has features found on higher end stands and safety features like the locking pins for the cable. Climbing may take a bit of getting used to, but you won’t find many stands this lightweight and quiet to climb with.

To see the X-1 Treestand in action check out the How-To video from the manufacturer below:

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Product Reviews

Glider Gloves for Bowhunting Deer [PRODUCT REVIEW]

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PROS: touch screen smartphones (tested on iPhone) function with high degree of accuracy, comfortable lightweight material, long cuffs, 10 finger touch screen capability

CONS: fit was slightly off, fingers were a bit short on my pair, not durable enough for use as an active hunting glove, grip material on glove palm creates torque on the bow hand

MSRP: $24.99

Last season I was contacted by Glider Gloves to field test a pair of their Urban Style Touchscreen Gloves. I had previously reviewed a pair of similar gloves by a company called A glove so I welcomed the chance to review these.

Compared to the Agloves, these gloves were higher quality and had a much longer cuff which is something I always look for in a hunting glove. As social media becomes a larger part of hunting and a growing part of NYBowhunter.com I welcomed the chance to be able to easily send updated to my Facebook fans from the tree stand. The Glider Gloves made it easy to text and check email while keeping my hands warm and concealed from the eyes of any nearby whitetail deer.

One thing bowhunters should note is the gloves have a grip on the palm. Some bowhunters, including myself, prefer not to have any grip on their gloves as it helps create torque which lead to less accurate shooting.

These gloves are great at what they were designed to do – be a comfortable touchscreen glove. However, for hunting purposes, you have to remember what these gloves were designed to do. If you plan on wearing these in the field and climbing up to your tree stand day in and day out you’ll rip through these knit gloves in about a month. If you want these gloves to last as a hunting glove you’re better off waiting until you’re settled in the stand before putting them on so there’s less wear and tear on the gloves.

Overall, I’d recommend these gloves if you’re looking for a true touch screen glove. They’re way nicer to use than similar hunting gloves with a silver pad on the pointer finger and thumb. Just remember, they’re not made for hunting, so don’t expect them to last you for several seasons if you’re rough with them.

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Product Reviews

Fuse Mossy Oak Rugged iPhone Case [PRODUCT REVIEW]

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Last spring I was contacted by Paul at Fuse to try out a new case they had for the iPhone called the Mossy Oak Rugged Orange iPhone 4/4S Shell Case. It combined my two favorite colors – hunter orange and camo – so I gave the case a try.

The case is made up of an inner soft rubber case that acts as a shock absorber and a rigid polycarbonate frame on the out side for added protection.

What I really liked about this case was the fact that it wasn’t covered in a sticky rubber like some of my other iPhone cases so it didn’t pull my pocket out of my pants every time I reached for my phone. Another nice feature is the size of the case, it’s not oversized so you still feel like you have a slim smartphone.

My only complaint about the case was that it didn’t come with a screen protector. It wasn’t hard to find a stick on screen protector online, but it would have been nice if the case included one for 360 degree protection.

This iPhone case travelled with me on scouting missions, spring turkey hunts and fall deer hunts. I really liked the phone case and never had any issues with it coming apart on me, in fact I was really impressed on how well it stayed together. One of my previous cases from another manufacturer used to come apart all the time, but the Fuse case just stayed together.

So how did the case hold up? My phone survived a few drops off of the counter top in my kitchen, it slipped out of my hand and dropped on the floor outside several times and I dropped it in the woods more times than I care to remember, but the case took the brunt of all of the hits and the phone didn’t get a scratch. Had I dropped the phone out of the tree stand it would have been a different story, I think only a fully enclosed phone case would really protect in the event of a 20 foot fall (which I’ve done with a previous case and my phone survived).

Overall this is a quality case for the iPhone. Add a clear antiglare screen protector and you’re set. If you’re looking for a stylish phone case give the Fuse Mossy Oak Rugged iPhone Case a try.

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Product Reviews

Bowtech Releases its First Carbon Riser Bow the Carbon Knight

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Bowtech Archery has released it’s first carbon riser bow – the Carbon Knight. Following the lead of Hoyt with the Carbon Matrix back in 2010, the new Carbon Knight from Bowtech weighs in at just 3.2 pounds (compared to 3.6 pounds for Hoyt’s Carbon Element G3).

Most manufacturers launch their new bows in the early fall (Bowtech usually launches their new bows at the ATA Show), but this one was “just too good to hold any longer,” says Samuel Coalson, Director of Marketing for Bowtech.

The Carbon Knight is said to have a smooth draw and plenty of speed at 330 feet per second. The Carbon Knight features Bowtech’s binary cam design, the Knight Riser constructed from durable carbon, a 7-inch brace height for forgiveness and a 32-inch axle-to-axle length. Draw lengths range from 26.5″ to 30.5″ and draw weights from 50 to 70 pounds in ten pound increments.

The bow is available in Black Ops and retails for $849 (Hoyt’s carbon bows are in the $1,200 range).

The new Carbon Knight definitely looks like an interesting bow and it’s a bow I’d like to try out and compare to some of the other carbon bows currently on the market. If you get a chance to shoot one leave a comment below and let us know what you think.

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Wilderness Athlete [PRODUCT REVIEW] – NY Bowhunter

Product Reviews

Wilderness Athlete [PRODUCT REVIEW]

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Yesterday I wrote about preparing your body for the hunt, but how do you keep your body in top shape during the hunt? Nutrition is key when you’re pushing your body to its limits. It doesn’t matter if you’re hunting hard all day or backpacking on a 5-day wilderness hunt in the mountains, if you don’t keep yourself hydrated and well-nourished you will crash before you get a chance to succeed. When I was a collegiate athlete rowing on the Hudson River at 6:00 am six days a week training for the short racing season in the spring, I would fuel myself with lots of carbs to give me the extra energy I expended during my workouts. The same principle holds true for us as hunters. When we’re out there during the very few chances we get each year it’s imperative that we make the most of every outing. The last thing you want on one of these hunts is for your body to call it quits and force you to end a hunt early. In the past, I would keep myself well hydrated with water and chow down on some trail mix, dried fruit, PowerGel, and Clif Bars. These were good products, but they didn’t have all the supplements I needed as I trekked through the backcountry. This year things changed as I finally was able to find a company that made a product formulated specifically for outdoor athletes – Wilderness Athlete.

Wilderness Athlete is the only company that offers the full line of nutrition bars, gels, hydration drinks, energy drinks, and multi-vitamins for the outdoor athlete. Wilderness Athlete was founded by Mark Paulsen, who worked as a University Director of Athletic Performance for more than twenty-five years. He started the company as he began to wonder why the science of mainstream sports nutrition had not yet been applied to the specific needs of the outdoor athlete? His simple thought led him to create a group of products that help hardcore hunters like Cameron Hanes, Guy Eastman, Bill Winke, Warren Strickland, and Trevon Stoltzfus never have to worry about their body’s being malnourished while in pursuit of trophy game. I’ve had a chance to try all of their products and they taste great, are affordable and are worth their weight in gold in the field.

WA Energy Bars are held to higher standards than most nutritional bars. The products use organic Agave Syrup for their natural sweeter which also serves as a great source for energy. The Energy Bars are made with pharmaceutical-grade vitamins and minerals ensuring maximum absorption and utilization. The Energy Bars also contain antioxidants, oxygen enhancers, anti-inflammatories, which are gluten-free and have no trans fats. Another important thing to note about the Energy Bars is their time-release energy which slowly releases the nutrients into your body in a steady stream so you don’t crash after an hour. I always pack a few bars in my backpack when I’m hunting for deer or black bear in the mountains here in New York. Personally, my favorite flavor is Peanut Butter Crunch, but they also come in three additional flavors to keep things interesting.

Another product they offer which, I must admit, I was hesitant at first to try, is their Blast Nutritional Gel. You can almost think of this as sucking the jelly out of a Raspberry filled donut. I suggest you give this a try before you knock it, it’s much better than it might sound and it gets its job done. What Blast does is give you a burst of energy when you need it most. The gel is made with long-chain maltodextrin carbohydrates that are quickly broken down and absorbed in the digestive tract, and are then utilized to give peak energy for up to one hour. This is most useful when you reach the peak of the mountain and need that extra boost to get to that buck bedded in the river bottom below. The gel also helps with muscle repair and oxygen absorption which is critical to keep you going.

One of my personal favorite products is Alert Energy Drink. This is not your typical carbonated, over a sweet beverage. These convenient individual serving packets can be poured into 8-12 ounces of water and will keep you awake during the tail end of your morning hunt (when I usually start falling asleep). No need to worry that these products will give you the jitters like a shot of espresso would. This drink has been formulated for athletes and used by the U.S. Olympic Archery Team and Olympic Biathletes. If you’re shooting at 90 meters without a peep sight you don’t want your energy drink to give you the shakes. If it works for the U.S. Olympic Archery Team then it works for me. This product is also great for backpacking trips because the individual serving packets weigh next to nothing and help you get right back in the game after your afternoon nap.

The last product I’ll cover here is the Hydro2Max Hydration Drink. As I said before, keeping hydrated is critical in all hunting situations. Like Alert, this product also comes in individual serving packets that can be conveniently added to a bottle of water (here’s a little trick I like to do – take one packet of Alert and one packet of Hydro2Max and mix them with 16 ounces of water and start drinking the mixture on the tail end of your hike to your stand so you’re ready when the moment of truth arrives). Hydro2Max provides an excellent source of electrolytes, vitamins, minerals, amino acids, and metabolic cofactors that power their way into the cells of the body. What does this mean exactly, well it means that the minerals your body used on the way to the stand or chasing that bull are now replenished and the rate of which oxygen is being absorbed by your body is now increased to normal levels.

For more information on all of the Wilderness Athlete products visit their website at www.wildernessathlete.org. On a side note, I was not paid by the Company to write this article, but I am on their ProStaff (and purchase their products with my own money – no freebies). I wrote this article because I personally find these products to give me an edge when I’m in the field and they have been the reason I have been able to go as far as I have on some of my recent hunts (notably, my black bear hunt through an extremely mountainous region). They won’t make monster bucks appear out of anywhere, but they’ll give your body the fuel it needs to take you where you need to go to get them. Give them a try and let me know what you think – good or bad.

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Product Reviews

Glider Gloves for Bowhunting Deer [PRODUCT REVIEW]

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PROS: touch screen smartphones (tested on iPhone) function with high degree of accuracy, comfortable lightweight material, long cuffs, 10 finger touch screen capability

CONS: fit was slightly off, fingers were a bit short on my pair, not durable enough for use as an active hunting glove, grip material on glove palm creates torque on the bow hand

MSRP: $24.99

Last season I was contacted by Glider Gloves to field test a pair of their Urban Style Touchscreen Gloves. I had previously reviewed a pair of similar gloves by a company called A glove so I welcomed the chance to review these.

Compared to the Agloves, these gloves were higher quality and had a much longer cuff which is something I always look for in a hunting glove. As social media becomes a larger part of hunting and a growing part of NYBowhunter.com I welcomed the chance to be able to easily send updated to my Facebook fans from the tree stand. The Glider Gloves made it easy to text and check email while keeping my hands warm and concealed from the eyes of any nearby whitetail deer.

One thing bowhunters should note is the gloves have a grip on the palm. Some bowhunters, including myself, prefer not to have any grip on their gloves as it helps create torque which lead to less accurate shooting.

These gloves are great at what they were designed to do – be a comfortable touchscreen glove. However, for hunting purposes, you have to remember what these gloves were designed to do. If you plan on wearing these in the field and climbing up to your tree stand day in and day out you’ll rip through these knit gloves in about a month. If you want these gloves to last as a hunting glove you’re better off waiting until you’re settled in the stand before putting them on so there’s less wear and tear on the gloves.

Overall, I’d recommend these gloves if you’re looking for a true touch screen glove. They’re way nicer to use than similar hunting gloves with a silver pad on the pointer finger and thumb. Just remember, they’re not made for hunting, so don’t expect them to last you for several seasons if you’re rough with them.

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Product Reviews

Fuse Mossy Oak Rugged iPhone Case [PRODUCT REVIEW]

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Last spring I was contacted by Paul at Fuse to try out a new case they had for the iPhone called the Mossy Oak Rugged Orange iPhone 4/4S Shell Case. It combined my two favorite colors – hunter orange and camo – so I gave the case a try.

The case is made up of an inner soft rubber case that acts as a shock absorber and a rigid polycarbonate frame on the out side for added protection.

What I really liked about this case was the fact that it wasn’t covered in a sticky rubber like some of my other iPhone cases so it didn’t pull my pocket out of my pants every time I reached for my phone. Another nice feature is the size of the case, it’s not oversized so you still feel like you have a slim smartphone.

My only complaint about the case was that it didn’t come with a screen protector. It wasn’t hard to find a stick on screen protector online, but it would have been nice if the case included one for 360 degree protection.

This iPhone case travelled with me on scouting missions, spring turkey hunts and fall deer hunts. I really liked the phone case and never had any issues with it coming apart on me, in fact I was really impressed on how well it stayed together. One of my previous cases from another manufacturer used to come apart all the time, but the Fuse case just stayed together.

So how did the case hold up? My phone survived a few drops off of the counter top in my kitchen, it slipped out of my hand and dropped on the floor outside several times and I dropped it in the woods more times than I care to remember, but the case took the brunt of all of the hits and the phone didn’t get a scratch. Had I dropped the phone out of the tree stand it would have been a different story, I think only a fully enclosed phone case would really protect in the event of a 20 foot fall (which I’ve done with a previous case and my phone survived).

Overall this is a quality case for the iPhone. Add a clear antiglare screen protector and you’re set. If you’re looking for a stylish phone case give the Fuse Mossy Oak Rugged iPhone Case a try.

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Product Reviews

Bowtech Releases its First Carbon Riser Bow the Carbon Knight

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Bowtech Archery has released it’s first carbon riser bow – the Carbon Knight. Following the lead of Hoyt with the Carbon Matrix back in 2010, the new Carbon Knight from Bowtech weighs in at just 3.2 pounds (compared to 3.6 pounds for Hoyt’s Carbon Element G3).

Most manufacturers launch their new bows in the early fall (Bowtech usually launches their new bows at the ATA Show), but this one was “just too good to hold any longer,” says Samuel Coalson, Director of Marketing for Bowtech.

The Carbon Knight is said to have a smooth draw and plenty of speed at 330 feet per second. The Carbon Knight features Bowtech’s binary cam design, the Knight Riser constructed from durable carbon, a 7-inch brace height for forgiveness and a 32-inch axle-to-axle length. Draw lengths range from 26.5″ to 30.5″ and draw weights from 50 to 70 pounds in ten pound increments.

The bow is available in Black Ops and retails for $849 (Hoyt’s carbon bows are in the $1,200 range).

The new Carbon Knight definitely looks like an interesting bow and it’s a bow I’d like to try out and compare to some of the other carbon bows currently on the market. If you get a chance to shoot one leave a comment below and let us know what you think.

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Turkey and Antler Displays from Mountain Mikes – NY Bowhunter

ATA Trade Show

Turkey and Antler Displays from Mountain Mikes

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Mountain Mikes had a wide range of reproduction mounts and displays at the ATA Show in Indianapolis. The Skull Master can be used for deer and elk and allows each antler to be fixed to the reproduction skull. This also allows you to mount shed antlers.

The Skull Master is available in classic white along with dipped models in wood grain, fall camo and snow camo. For those that want to use their original skull plate (to qualify for P&Y or B&C) there is the Record Keeper. A similar design, except you use the original skull plate to attach to the reproduction skull and then putty to blend the two together.

The Rack Plaque is new for 2011 and features a Bone Collector leather cover for your antlers along with a Brotherhood plaque. This is a quick, simple and great looking way to display your antlers!

One of my personal favorite additions for 2011 is the Bear Collector. The Beard Collector also features a Bone Collector logo on the front and allows you to mount one turkey tail fan, one set of turkey legs and five beards!

Check out Mountain Mikes for more information on these products and where you can purchase them.

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ATA Trade Show

NAP Introduces the Killzone 2-blade Broadhead

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One of the newest additions to New Archery Products’ (NAP) family of broadheads is the Killzone. The Killzone is a rear-deploying 2-blade broadhead with a 2″ cutting diameter. New technology allows both blades to open and work together in unison for increased reliability. Another advantage of this design is that it allows the broadhead to gain maximum penetration while avoiding any single blade deployment or deflection upon impact or during penetration of the cavity.

With no o-rings or rubber bands to hold the blades in place bowhunters don’t have to worry about the blades prematurely opening. The rear-deployment design is also the least restrictive when it comes to penetration which means it doesn’t rob much of the arrow’s energy upon impact. Two blades also require less energy to push through an animal than 3 or 4 blade broadheads.
The blades on the Killzone feature NAP’s Diamized blade technology which NAP claims is one of the sharpest blades in the industry. Another thing that bowhunters in states like New York will appreciate is that the blades on the Killzone fold back, so it is not a barbed broadhead and is legal in most states including states like New York where barbed broadheads are illegal.
The Killzone is a 100 grain broadhead and available in three models: Cut-On-Contact tip, Trophy Tip or Deep Six. Sold in a 3-pack, the Killzone also includes a practice head that is designed to be easily removed from your target and will not tear it up as the real broadhead would.
The Killzone is set to retail for $39.99. A 3-pack of replaceable blades and tips will also be available. The blades are easily replaced and come with blades, replacement screws and wrench. Practice heads are also sold separately and will be in a 1 pack for $9.99.

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ATA Trade Show

Muzzy Introduces New DX-3 Broadhead

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I’m really excited about Easton’s new Injexion arrows with the smallest diameter of any hunting arrow on the market (just .236 compared to .294 for a standard diameter carbon arrow). The smaller diameter arrow shaft allows for increased penetration and decreased wind drift. The smaller diameter arrow, however, required Easton to develop the Deep Six insert.

Deep Six inserts, which use a non-conventional thread pattern (40 threads per inch instead of 32 threads per inch), provide 25% more thread engagement to keep points secure inside the insert. Additionally, the inserts are made from stainless-steel instead of aluminum for a 25% increase in strength. It also means your standard broadheads won’t work with the new Deep Six inserts and only specially designed broadheads will work. One such broadhead is the new Muzzy DX-3.
I had a chance to stop by the Muzzy booth at the ATA Trade Show and get my hands on a DX-3. Speaking with the guys in the booth I learned just how painstaking of a process developing the new DX-3 was – moving 1/10 of a grain from one end of the broadhead to another while still maintaining the 100g final weight was no easy feat.
The DX-3 is in essence a modified MX-3 with a slightly thicker ferrule and a tapered end to meet the shaft diameter for less friction and drag during flight. The same .025″ blades found on the MX-3 are used on the new DX-3 which also has a cutting diameter of 1-1/4″.

The Muzzy DX-3, coupled with the Easton Deep Six System, produces less wind drag than other larger broadhead-arrow combinations, resulting in increased accuracy and deeper penetration. When the same amount of energy is concentrated in the smaller Deep Six/DX-3 package, the result is devastating. The DX-3 also fits Easton’s Axis and Full Metal Jacket with Deep Six inserts. The Muzzy DX-3 has an MSRP of $29.95.

I’m really looking forward to shooting the new DX-3 and comparing the penetration against a MX-3 on a standard shaft. I have a feeling there will be a very noticeable difference in penetration. Now I just need get my hands on some Easton Injexion shafts!

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2012 Bowtech Insanity CPX and CPXL released at the ATA Trade Show

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Following on tradition, Bowtech once again unveiled it’s new flagship bow at this years ATA Trade Show in Columbus, Ohio.

Advertisements with the phrase “Contain the Insane” were showing up everywhere and fueled anticipation for the unveiling of Bowtech’s latest creation. At 9:00 am on January 10th it happened – the Bowtech Insanity was unveiled to an enthusiastic crowd on the showroom floor at the ATA Trade Show.

The Insanity comes in two versions, a 32″ model shooting 355 feet per second and a 35″ model shooting 340 feet per second.

Featured on the Insanity bows is Center Pivot Extreme Technology, which resists shooter induced torque for greater forgiveness and accuracy. The OverDrive Binary Cam System to eliminate cam lean issues and provide exceptional tuning to produce cleaner arrow flight for greater accuracy.

HardCore limbs boost efficiency for more speed without a harsh draw. On typical limbs, most of the bow’s energy is stored near the outside of the limb, while the core stores minimal energy and serves as little more than a spacer.

HardCore Limbs put the core to work, storing energy not only near the surfaces, but also inside the limb. By sharing the workload, stress is reduced, producing exceptional durability. The carbon core is also significantly lighter than other limb materials available today, which produces a tighter physical response for increased energy efficiency, less noise, and less vibration.

The FLX-Guard greatly reduces cable guard torque to produce better arrow flight and easier tuning for greater accuracy. As the archer draws back, the cable guard flexes inward absorbing the cable guard torque that would normally be transferred to the riser. This also reduces lateral nock travel which increases the tuneability, forgiveness and accuracy of the bow.

The Carbon Rod String Stop is made of carbon, an extremely strong material with vibration-dampening properties. It is positioned directly in line with the stabilizer to effectively transfer vibration from the string to the stabilizer. This optimizes bow balance and dissipates noise and vibration efficiently.

Both bows come standard in Mossy Oak Treestand. Alternative finishes include Mossy Oak Infinity, GORE Optifade Forest or Open Country, Realtree APG HD and BlackOps. Target colors AnoRock Onyx and Inferno area also available. All finished except Mossy Oak Treestand include black limbs.

The insanity CPXL has a longer axle-to-axle length for added stability and forgiveness, which makes it the perfect fit for archers with a draw length up to 32″. The Insanity CPX will have a suggested retail price of $999 and the CPXL will retail for $1,049.

I had a chance to shoot the Bowtech Insanity side by side with last year’s Invasion at the Bowtech shooting lane. Shooting the Insanity was exciting as the bow really put some heat behind the arrows as it sent them down range.

One thing that stood out to me when drawing the bow was the short valley. Upon releasing the arrow I felt a lingering vibration throughout the bow. However, this was a bare bow so some vibration is to be expected and a hunting rig outfitted with a stabilizer and other accessories should significantly decrease if not completely eliminate any vibration.

Another notable mention was the overall balance of the Insanity. When shooting last year’s Invasion, the bow slightly kicked back after the shot. The new design of the Bowtech Insanity makes the bow extremely well balanced and the Insanity remained steady even after the shot.

Overall, I think Bowtech did a good job with the Insanity and there were noticeable improvements over the Invasion, specifically in the overall balance of the bow. The bow was fast, the grip was slim and the bow was easy to keep on target. The valley was short, however, and I did have one draw where I let up a little while at full draw and the bow pulled me forward.

If you have a chance, take a trip to your local Bowtech dealer and shoot the Insanity to see what it’s all about.

SPECIFICATIONS
CPX
Brace Height: 6″
Draw Weights: 50, 60, 70, 80
Draw Length: 25.5-30 inches
Axle to Axle: 32″
IBO/ATA Speed: 355 fps
Kinetic Energy: 98.0 ft.-lbs. at 70 lbs.
Effective Let-Off: approx 80%
MSRP: $999
CPXL
Brace Height: 7″
Draw Weights: 50, 60, 70, 80
Draw Length: 27.5-32 inches
Axle to Axle: 35″
IBO/ATA Speed: 340 fps
Kinetic Energy: 89.9 ft.-lbs. at 70 lbs.
Effective Let-Off: approx 80%
MSRP: $1,049

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Turkey Hunting Contest – NY Bowhunter

Turkey Hunting

Turkey Hunting Contest

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I know this is a little last minute, but it’s still not too late to enter! Many of you know Othmar Vohringer who writes several outdoor blogs including Wild Turkey Fever. Othmar is holding a turkey hunting contest until May 31st and the winner will get an Heirloom Turkey Call! I recently entered the contest: here’s my entry.

Simply send Othmar your 2008 spring turkey harvest pictures and include a short story about the hunt and equipment used. (All pictures submitted must be from turkeys harvests made during this year’s spring hunting season. Only one submission per hunter is permitted.)

All submissions will be posted on the Wild Turkey Fever blog and the winner will be chosen by Othmar. The winner will receive an original Heirloom Double Barrel call (photo) from Othmar’s personal stock (Othmar is a Pro Staffer for Heirloom Turkey Calls).

The double-barrel call features two sound surfaces one in a glass the other surface is made of quality slate. This unique feature gives a hunter essentially two in one call and the sound variety needed to fool a tom in thinking that he follows the calls of several hens.

The contest ends on May 31. Submissions of a later date are welcome but cannot take part in the contest of winning an Heirloom turkey call.

I encourage all of you to enter the contest and you can do so by visiting Othmar’s blog, Wild Turkey Fever.

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Turkey Hunting

Spring Turkey Season Opens May 1 in New York

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Bowhunters take to the woods this spring after weary old gobblers in New York.

It’s my favorite time of year after deer season – the spring turkey season (probably because it’s the only other time I’m out hunting with my bow). Following suit of previous seasons, the 2014 spring turkey season opens May 1 in all of upstate New York lying north of the Bronx-Westchester County boundary and the annual youth turkey hunting weekend is April 26-27. The youth turkey hunt is open in all of upstate New York and Suffolk County.

Not nearly as popular as deer hunting, there only 100,000 turkey hunters expected to head afield this spring. Honestly, I don’t know how anyone can’t get excited about calling to a bird and have it respond and watch it work its way in. It’s a very interactive hunt.

According to the DEC, hunters must have a turkey hunting permit in addition to their small game hunting or sportsman license (if purchased before Feb. 1) or hunting license (if purchased after Feb. 1).

  • Shooting hours are from one-half hour before sunrise to noon each day.
  • Hunters may take two bearded turkeys during the spring season, but only one bird per day.
  • Hunters may not use rifles or handguns firing a bullet. Hunters may hunt with a shotgun or handgun loaded with shot sizes no larger than No. 2 or smaller than No. 8, or with a bow and arrow.
  • Crossbows may not be used for the spring 2014 turkey season.
  • Successful hunters must fill out the tag that comes with their turkey permit and immediately attach it to any turkey harvested.
  • Successful hunters must report their harvest within seven days of taking a bird.

One thing that caught my eye is that the state’s enacted 2014-15 budget includes language authorizing the use of crossbows for hunting under certain circumstances. So while hunters cannot use crossbows to take wild turkey during the 2014 spring season, they might be able to in 2015. It will be interesting to see if the changes go through for next year and what affect that would have on the number of hunters taking to the field for turkey hunting.

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Turkey Hunting

Bowhunting Turkey in New York

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Teresa took this big longbeard on the opening day of the 2012 Spring Turkey Hunting Season in Orange County, New York. This is Teresa’s first turkey kill and she got the job done with a heart-pounding 23-yard shot. Congrats to Teresa on an awesome longbeard!

Did you have success this spring? It was tough with the warm weather we had in April before the opener.

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Turkey Hunting

NY Bowhunter Takes Turkey During Fall Archery Season

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Last Friday morning my cousin Ken had the day off to enjoy a day afield. He was set up in his tree well before first light, but the morning was really slow and Ken only saw one deer. The tall spike came down the hill 50 yards to his right and kept on walking to wherever it was that he was going.

With no rubs or scrapes in the general area, Ken and his father Nick decided to hunt a different area that afternoon. On the drive to their hunting spot that afternoon they spotted a flock of turkeys and ten deer out in a field just a few door down from where they would be hunting.

Ken headed to his stand at the top of the hill and waited in anticipation for the deer and turkey to leave the field and move back into the hardwoods. Around 5:00 pm the woods exploded with noise and movement and the deer and turkey came barreling through the woods. Shortly after, Ken heard a lady yelling at her dog who must have decided it would be fun to chase the deer and turkeys out of the nearby field.

Then Ken heard a single turkey coming towards him from the bottom of the hill. Ken got ready and drew back with the bird at 20 yards. The bird took two more steps and Ken made a chirping sound to stop it and let the arrow fly. The bird only made it a few more yards before going down.

Congrats to Ken on taking a turkey with the bow, that’s never an easy thing!

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Turkey Vitals Diagram – NY Bowhunter

Turkey Hunting

Turkey Vitals Diagram

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I get a lot of questions about where to shoot a turkey with a bow. I prefer to take a shot of a broadside bird and aim right above the legs in the center of the wing. With a perfect shot you will take out both of the turkey’s legs and drop the bird in its tracks.
Here is where I like to place the shot:

Like deer hunting, it is important to wait for the perfect shot with a turkey. This is especially true since the target is so small. A smaller target decreases your odds of a deadly hit, so wait for the bird to turn broadside and squeeze off that trigger. Once you let that arrow fly you can go get your longbeard!

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Turkey Hunting

Spring Turkey Season Opens May 1 in New York

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Bowhunters take to the woods this spring after weary old gobblers in New York.

It’s my favorite time of year after deer season – the spring turkey season (probably because it’s the only other time I’m out hunting with my bow). Following suit of previous seasons, the 2014 spring turkey season opens May 1 in all of upstate New York lying north of the Bronx-Westchester County boundary and the annual youth turkey hunting weekend is April 26-27. The youth turkey hunt is open in all of upstate New York and Suffolk County.

Not nearly as popular as deer hunting, there only 100,000 turkey hunters expected to head afield this spring. Honestly, I don’t know how anyone can’t get excited about calling to a bird and have it respond and watch it work its way in. It’s a very interactive hunt.

According to the DEC, hunters must have a turkey hunting permit in addition to their small game hunting or sportsman license (if purchased before Feb. 1) or hunting license (if purchased after Feb. 1).

  • Shooting hours are from one-half hour before sunrise to noon each day.
  • Hunters may take two bearded turkeys during the spring season, but only one bird per day.
  • Hunters may not use rifles or handguns firing a bullet. Hunters may hunt with a shotgun or handgun loaded with shot sizes no larger than No. 2 or smaller than No. 8, or with a bow and arrow.
  • Crossbows may not be used for the spring 2014 turkey season.
  • Successful hunters must fill out the tag that comes with their turkey permit and immediately attach it to any turkey harvested.
  • Successful hunters must report their harvest within seven days of taking a bird.

One thing that caught my eye is that the state’s enacted 2014-15 budget includes language authorizing the use of crossbows for hunting under certain circumstances. So while hunters cannot use crossbows to take wild turkey during the 2014 spring season, they might be able to in 2015. It will be interesting to see if the changes go through for next year and what affect that would have on the number of hunters taking to the field for turkey hunting.

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Turkey Hunting

Bowhunting Turkey in New York

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Teresa took this big longbeard on the opening day of the 2012 Spring Turkey Hunting Season in Orange County, New York. This is Teresa’s first turkey kill and she got the job done with a heart-pounding 23-yard shot. Congrats to Teresa on an awesome longbeard!

Did you have success this spring? It was tough with the warm weather we had in April before the opener.

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Turkey Hunting

NY Bowhunter Takes Turkey During Fall Archery Season

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Last Friday morning my cousin Ken had the day off to enjoy a day afield. He was set up in his tree well before first light, but the morning was really slow and Ken only saw one deer. The tall spike came down the hill 50 yards to his right and kept on walking to wherever it was that he was going.

With no rubs or scrapes in the general area, Ken and his father Nick decided to hunt a different area that afternoon. On the drive to their hunting spot that afternoon they spotted a flock of turkeys and ten deer out in a field just a few door down from where they would be hunting.

Ken headed to his stand at the top of the hill and waited in anticipation for the deer and turkey to leave the field and move back into the hardwoods. Around 5:00 pm the woods exploded with noise and movement and the deer and turkey came barreling through the woods. Shortly after, Ken heard a lady yelling at her dog who must have decided it would be fun to chase the deer and turkeys out of the nearby field.

Then Ken heard a single turkey coming towards him from the bottom of the hill. Ken got ready and drew back with the bird at 20 yards. The bird took two more steps and Ken made a chirping sound to stop it and let the arrow fly. The bird only made it a few more yards before going down.

Congrats to Ken on taking a turkey with the bow, that’s never an easy thing!

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Tree Spider Introduces the Speed Harness and Speed Vest – NY Bowhunter

ATA Trade Show

Tree Spider Introduces the Speed Harness and Speed Vest

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One of the largest booths at the ATA Show was the Tree Spider booth by Robinson Outdoors, the makers of Scent Blocker and Scent Shield.

Tree Spider has two safety harness models, the Speed Harness (pictured above) and the Speed Vest (the camo vest further down in this article). Both models include the Spider Speed Clips, Venom buckles (one on each leg and one for the waist), and Ario Mesh Back for increased air flow.

The Speed Harness is an extremely innovative safety harness that utilizes a figure 8 pattern, Tree Spider calls it the X-Web Fit, to hold the hunter. Not only does this pattern utilize less material than other safety harness designs, but it also seems to want to hug the body for a closer and more comfortable fit – although without being able to try on the vest, I can’t confirm that it actually is more comfortable than other safety harnesses.

Like most safety harnesses, the Speed Hunter incorporates climbing loops on each side of the waist allowing use of a lineman’s rope when hanging tree stands or installing tree steps.

The second model, the Speed Vest, is a slightly larger version of the Speed Harness available in Realtree AP and Mossy Oak Infinity. The Speed Vest has two zippered pockets on the outside for holding your rangefinder, game calls or other accessories.

The contoured front and back panels allow the Speed Vest to conform to your body for a closer fit. This translates into less bulk which is especially important to the archer.

While I think the yellow tether and accents are a visually appealing touch, I’m not so sure I’d want to be wearing any yellow while deer hunting. I’m not really worried about the deer, it’s more the other animals that might notice the yellow and go on high alert that I’m worried about – as soon as a deer sees a turkey on high alert you can be sure a whitetail won’t stick around to find out what’s making that turkey putt.

The Speed Harness and Speed Vest are available in three sizes: S/M, LG/XL, 2XL/3XL with a weight capacity range from 115 – 300 pounds.

An additional feature of the Speed Vest are clips on the back of the vest. This will allow you to wear the vest underneath certain Scent Blocker jackets and clip right into the jacket making it effortless to put on your safety harness and take it off when the hunt is through.

The Tree Spider harnesses will be available during the Summer 2011. Visit www.treespidersafety.com for more information.

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ATA Trade Show

NAP Introduces the Killzone 2-blade Broadhead

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One of the newest additions to New Archery Products’ (NAP) family of broadheads is the Killzone. The Killzone is a rear-deploying 2-blade broadhead with a 2″ cutting diameter. New technology allows both blades to open and work together in unison for increased reliability. Another advantage of this design is that it allows the broadhead to gain maximum penetration while avoiding any single blade deployment or deflection upon impact or during penetration of the cavity.

With no o-rings or rubber bands to hold the blades in place bowhunters don’t have to worry about the blades prematurely opening. The rear-deployment design is also the least restrictive when it comes to penetration which means it doesn’t rob much of the arrow’s energy upon impact. Two blades also require less energy to push through an animal than 3 or 4 blade broadheads.
The blades on the Killzone feature NAP’s Diamized blade technology which NAP claims is one of the sharpest blades in the industry. Another thing that bowhunters in states like New York will appreciate is that the blades on the Killzone fold back, so it is not a barbed broadhead and is legal in most states including states like New York where barbed broadheads are illegal.
The Killzone is a 100 grain broadhead and available in three models: Cut-On-Contact tip, Trophy Tip or Deep Six. Sold in a 3-pack, the Killzone also includes a practice head that is designed to be easily removed from your target and will not tear it up as the real broadhead would.
The Killzone is set to retail for $39.99. A 3-pack of replaceable blades and tips will also be available. The blades are easily replaced and come with blades, replacement screws and wrench. Practice heads are also sold separately and will be in a 1 pack for $9.99.

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ATA Trade Show

Muzzy Introduces New DX-3 Broadhead

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I’m really excited about Easton’s new Injexion arrows with the smallest diameter of any hunting arrow on the market (just .236 compared to .294 for a standard diameter carbon arrow). The smaller diameter arrow shaft allows for increased penetration and decreased wind drift. The smaller diameter arrow, however, required Easton to develop the Deep Six insert.

Deep Six inserts, which use a non-conventional thread pattern (40 threads per inch instead of 32 threads per inch), provide 25% more thread engagement to keep points secure inside the insert. Additionally, the inserts are made from stainless-steel instead of aluminum for a 25% increase in strength. It also means your standard broadheads won’t work with the new Deep Six inserts and only specially designed broadheads will work. One such broadhead is the new Muzzy DX-3.
I had a chance to stop by the Muzzy booth at the ATA Trade Show and get my hands on a DX-3. Speaking with the guys in the booth I learned just how painstaking of a process developing the new DX-3 was – moving 1/10 of a grain from one end of the broadhead to another while still maintaining the 100g final weight was no easy feat.
The DX-3 is in essence a modified MX-3 with a slightly thicker ferrule and a tapered end to meet the shaft diameter for less friction and drag during flight. The same .025″ blades found on the MX-3 are used on the new DX-3 which also has a cutting diameter of 1-1/4″.

The Muzzy DX-3, coupled with the Easton Deep Six System, produces less wind drag than other larger broadhead-arrow combinations, resulting in increased accuracy and deeper penetration. When the same amount of energy is concentrated in the smaller Deep Six/DX-3 package, the result is devastating. The DX-3 also fits Easton’s Axis and Full Metal Jacket with Deep Six inserts. The Muzzy DX-3 has an MSRP of $29.95.

I’m really looking forward to shooting the new DX-3 and comparing the penetration against a MX-3 on a standard shaft. I have a feeling there will be a very noticeable difference in penetration. Now I just need get my hands on some Easton Injexion shafts!

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2012 Bowtech Insanity CPX and CPXL released at the ATA Trade Show

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Following on tradition, Bowtech once again unveiled it’s new flagship bow at this years ATA Trade Show in Columbus, Ohio.

Advertisements with the phrase “Contain the Insane” were showing up everywhere and fueled anticipation for the unveiling of Bowtech’s latest creation. At 9:00 am on January 10th it happened – the Bowtech Insanity was unveiled to an enthusiastic crowd on the showroom floor at the ATA Trade Show.

The Insanity comes in two versions, a 32″ model shooting 355 feet per second and a 35″ model shooting 340 feet per second.

Featured on the Insanity bows is Center Pivot Extreme Technology, which resists shooter induced torque for greater forgiveness and accuracy. The OverDrive Binary Cam System to eliminate cam lean issues and provide exceptional tuning to produce cleaner arrow flight for greater accuracy.

HardCore limbs boost efficiency for more speed without a harsh draw. On typical limbs, most of the bow’s energy is stored near the outside of the limb, while the core stores minimal energy and serves as little more than a spacer.

HardCore Limbs put the core to work, storing energy not only near the surfaces, but also inside the limb. By sharing the workload, stress is reduced, producing exceptional durability. The carbon core is also significantly lighter than other limb materials available today, which produces a tighter physical response for increased energy efficiency, less noise, and less vibration.

The FLX-Guard greatly reduces cable guard torque to produce better arrow flight and easier tuning for greater accuracy. As the archer draws back, the cable guard flexes inward absorbing the cable guard torque that would normally be transferred to the riser. This also reduces lateral nock travel which increases the tuneability, forgiveness and accuracy of the bow.

The Carbon Rod String Stop is made of carbon, an extremely strong material with vibration-dampening properties. It is positioned directly in line with the stabilizer to effectively transfer vibration from the string to the stabilizer. This optimizes bow balance and dissipates noise and vibration efficiently.

Both bows come standard in Mossy Oak Treestand. Alternative finishes include Mossy Oak Infinity, GORE Optifade Forest or Open Country, Realtree APG HD and BlackOps. Target colors AnoRock Onyx and Inferno area also available. All finished except Mossy Oak Treestand include black limbs.

The insanity CPXL has a longer axle-to-axle length for added stability and forgiveness, which makes it the perfect fit for archers with a draw length up to 32″. The Insanity CPX will have a suggested retail price of $999 and the CPXL will retail for $1,049.

I had a chance to shoot the Bowtech Insanity side by side with last year’s Invasion at the Bowtech shooting lane. Shooting the Insanity was exciting as the bow really put some heat behind the arrows as it sent them down range.

One thing that stood out to me when drawing the bow was the short valley. Upon releasing the arrow I felt a lingering vibration throughout the bow. However, this was a bare bow so some vibration is to be expected and a hunting rig outfitted with a stabilizer and other accessories should significantly decrease if not completely eliminate any vibration.

Another notable mention was the overall balance of the Insanity. When shooting last year’s Invasion, the bow slightly kicked back after the shot. The new design of the Bowtech Insanity makes the bow extremely well balanced and the Insanity remained steady even after the shot.

Overall, I think Bowtech did a good job with the Insanity and there were noticeable improvements over the Invasion, specifically in the overall balance of the bow. The bow was fast, the grip was slim and the bow was easy to keep on target. The valley was short, however, and I did have one draw where I let up a little while at full draw and the bow pulled me forward.

If you have a chance, take a trip to your local Bowtech dealer and shoot the Insanity to see what it’s all about.

SPECIFICATIONS
CPX
Brace Height: 6″
Draw Weights: 50, 60, 70, 80
Draw Length: 25.5-30 inches
Axle to Axle: 32″
IBO/ATA Speed: 355 fps
Kinetic Energy: 98.0 ft.-lbs. at 70 lbs.
Effective Let-Off: approx 80%
MSRP: $999
CPXL
Brace Height: 7″
Draw Weights: 50, 60, 70, 80
Draw Length: 27.5-32 inches
Axle to Axle: 35″
IBO/ATA Speed: 340 fps
Kinetic Energy: 89.9 ft.-lbs. at 70 lbs.
Effective Let-Off: approx 80%
MSRP: $1,049

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Tree Stand Safety – NY Bowhunter

Archery Tips

Tree Stand Safety

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How many times have you rushed to the woods and thought to yourself, “I’ll just hook my harness up to the tree when I get to the top”?

I’ll raise my hand because a long time ago, I used to think that too. Who has time to attach your harness to the tree before you start climbing it and then keep moving it up the tree as you climb, it’s annoying. True. It is annoying. But how much do you value your life?

It was a cold winter afternoon in December and I headed to the deer woods. I knew where I was headed – a tree just off of a trail used by the deer after they crossed a creek. The tree was on a steep hillside with large rocks below and rushing water not more than 25 yards away. It was cold and rainy/snowy – not ideal conditions for a climbing stand. The bark on the tree I selected was also extremely smooth and hard – also not an ideal tree for a climber.

“I made it about 15 feet when suddenly the bottom of my stand fell from under my feet and I was dangling in the tree by my harness.”

I attached my safety belt to the tree and started to make my way to the top. I made it about 15 feet when suddenly the bottom of my stand fell from under my feet and I was dangling in the tree by my harness. I hugged the tree for my life as I tried to figure out what had just happened. Luckily I had attached the base of my treestand to the seat and the seat was still attached to the tree. I was able to get the base back and make my way onto the platform and safely climb down.

What would have happened to me if I didn’t have that safety harness on? I don’t know for sure, but there was a very good possibility that I would have fallen 15 feet to the ground, smashed my head on a rock knocking me unconscious and rolled into the rushing water below my stand drowning and if I was lucky, someone might have found me.

From that day on, I have never even questioned once if I should put my safety harness on. In fact, I put my safety harness on before I even leave my house, that way I can simply connect to the tree when I get to my stand. And these days, the only kind of harness I recommend wearing is a full body harness. A waist harness or waist harness with shoulder straps is not enough, always wear a full body harness.

I just bought a new climbing stand and made sure I read the manufacturers warnings and watched their safety DVD. Did I have to do it, no, but you always pick up a thing or two which makes it worth it. Take the half hour to go through the manual or watch the DVD, your life is worth it.

Be Smart. Wear a Safety Harness.

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Archery Tips

Keep Your Bowhunting Skills Sharp with 3D Shooting

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Over the last few weekends we’ve been headed over to Blue Mountain Sportsman Center to shoot 3D. The course has been a lot of fun to shoot. There’s several targets to shoot at including deer, turkey, bear, and fox. The terrain makes it very realistic practice for hunting with shots at inclines and declines to simulate actual hunting scenarios.

One thing I like to do is shoot from the furthest stakes and guess the yardage. Then after we all shoot we range the target to see how close we were to guessing the distance. This really helps me to learn how to judge distance in the field and is a valuable tool for when an animal catches you off guard in the field. Shooting from the furthest stakes also make the closer shots seem easier.

If you haven’t been out shooting 3D this summer then you better hurry up and get out there because hunting season will be here before you know it. Blue Mountain Sportsman Center is open Thursday – Sunday and holidays. Shooting a round of 3D costs $12 with a county park pass and is $15 without a park pass.

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Archery Tips

Indoor Archery Leagues at Extreme Archery

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Team NYB will be joining the Hunter League at Extreme Archery set to begin on September 3rd. The Hunter League will be held on Fridays for 6 weeks and feature various animal targets.

We’re looking forward to participating in the league and sharpening our skills for the upcoming season. The indoor league is a great way to meet fellow archers and practice shooting under a little bit of pressure!

Here are the details on the Indoor Archery Leagues at Extreme Archery:

Kids League ($70, 8 weeks)
– begins Saturday, September 4th @ 10:00am

300 Target League ($90, 7 weeks)
– begins Wednesday, September 1st @ 6:30pm

Hunter League ($90, 6 weeks)
– begins Friday, September 3rd @ 6:30pm

Traditional League (TBD)
– call to find out more

To sign up for any of the Indoor Archery Leagues call Extreme Archery at 914-777-7500.

Extreme Archery is located at 801 East Boston Post Rd, Mamaroneck, NY 10543.

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Archery Tips

How to Set the Perfect Treestand

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This is something new I’m adding to my arsenal of tricks this season to help me set the perfect stand (works for trail cams too)! It’s called the Photographer’s Ephemeris, a tool designed to help landscape photographers take the perfect picture at sunrise or sunset.

The tool allows you to pick a location, date and time to see exactly where the sun and moon will be. This allows you to follow the path of the sun and moon on any given date and at any given time.

So how does this help the hunter? Simple. It allows the hunter to find a stand location on the map and then see how the sun will rise and set during the hunting season so that the sun is never in the hunter’s eyes.

I entered the location of our lease in the program and changed the date to opening day. Where we have our stands situated is in the perfect spot with the sun rising to our right and circling behind us before setting to our left. That means if the deer are out in the hunting plot where we hope to shoot them we will have the sun behind us which will make it much harder for the deer to pick us out of the tree.

This is a great tool I will be playing around with more and more this season as I hang some tree stands over the next few weeks. Below is a video on how it works:

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Timberline Archery NoPeep [PRODUCT REVIEW] – NY Bowhunter

Product Reviews

Timberline Archery NoPeep [PRODUCT REVIEW]

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A few months ago after being fed up with my peep sight, I decided to give Timberline Archery’s No-Peep a try. The No-Peep is a rear sight that mounts under your bow sight. There are a large ring and a dot and you must position the dot in the center of the ring creating a bullseye. What this is supposed to do in theory is make sure you have the same anchor point time and time again as a regular peep sight would.

I ordered a No-Peep online for $35 and received it in a few days. When I opened the package I saw this strange looking contraption that would somehow be affixed to my bow. The No-Peep can be mounted either above or below your side and in front or in the back of your bows riser. There are plenty of options so pick one that suits you best before continuing on. I wanted the no peep in front of my riser and below my sight, so I had to flip my sight mounting bracket upside down to achieve this (which obviously threw my bow off sight). I would strongly suggest leaving your peep sight in while attempting to install the No-Peep.

Once the No-Peep is installed the real fun begins. Now you have to fine-tune this super sensitive rear sight, making micro-adjustments, but there are no lines to guide you and everything requires a different size Allen key to adjust. This product would be 1000 times better if it was designed as a tool-less piece of equipment with dials to adjust the sight so you could achieve perfect sight alignment in a quarter of the time or less. I was going back and forth making tiny adjustments with the No-Peep and it was getting very frustrating.

When I finally had the No-Peep aligned to my satisfaction I began to shoot my bow. I shot a few groups and made some adjustments and then shot some more. My groups were horrible! I could shoot an untuned bow better than I could shoot this thing through my perfectly tuned bow. My groups went from 3″ to well over 6″ and there was no consistency. My arrows hit the target all over the map except for where I was aiming. I just could not get this to work for the life of me. After a few hours of frustration, I decided to call it a day and give the No-Peep a try again in the morning.

The next day I picked up my bow and shot a few arrows into the target, getting the same result as I did the day before – arrows everywhere with no consistency. After this brief testing of the No-Peep, I knew just where it belonged – in the garbage and not on my bow. What a waste of time and effort this was and the results were horrific. I would strongly discourage anyone from purchasing this product it does not work better than a peep sight and it will cause you more headaches than its worth! Get a G5 Meta Peep and save yourself the trouble!

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Product Reviews

Glider Gloves for Bowhunting Deer [PRODUCT REVIEW]

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PROS: touch screen smartphones (tested on iPhone) function with high degree of accuracy, comfortable lightweight material, long cuffs, 10 finger touch screen capability

CONS: fit was slightly off, fingers were a bit short on my pair, not durable enough for use as an active hunting glove, grip material on glove palm creates torque on the bow hand

MSRP: $24.99

Last season I was contacted by Glider Gloves to field test a pair of their Urban Style Touchscreen Gloves. I had previously reviewed a pair of similar gloves by a company called A glove so I welcomed the chance to review these.

Compared to the Agloves, these gloves were higher quality and had a much longer cuff which is something I always look for in a hunting glove. As social media becomes a larger part of hunting and a growing part of NYBowhunter.com I welcomed the chance to be able to easily send updated to my Facebook fans from the tree stand. The Glider Gloves made it easy to text and check email while keeping my hands warm and concealed from the eyes of any nearby whitetail deer.

One thing bowhunters should note is the gloves have a grip on the palm. Some bowhunters, including myself, prefer not to have any grip on their gloves as it helps create torque which lead to less accurate shooting.

These gloves are great at what they were designed to do – be a comfortable touchscreen glove. However, for hunting purposes, you have to remember what these gloves were designed to do. If you plan on wearing these in the field and climbing up to your tree stand day in and day out you’ll rip through these knit gloves in about a month. If you want these gloves to last as a hunting glove you’re better off waiting until you’re settled in the stand before putting them on so there’s less wear and tear on the gloves.

Overall, I’d recommend these gloves if you’re looking for a true touch screen glove. They’re way nicer to use than similar hunting gloves with a silver pad on the pointer finger and thumb. Just remember, they’re not made for hunting, so don’t expect them to last you for several seasons if you’re rough with them.

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Product Reviews

Fuse Mossy Oak Rugged iPhone Case [PRODUCT REVIEW]

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Last spring I was contacted by Paul at Fuse to try out a new case they had for the iPhone called the Mossy Oak Rugged Orange iPhone 4/4S Shell Case. It combined my two favorite colors – hunter orange and camo – so I gave the case a try.

The case is made up of an inner soft rubber case that acts as a shock absorber and a rigid polycarbonate frame on the out side for added protection.

What I really liked about this case was the fact that it wasn’t covered in a sticky rubber like some of my other iPhone cases so it didn’t pull my pocket out of my pants every time I reached for my phone. Another nice feature is the size of the case, it’s not oversized so you still feel like you have a slim smartphone.

My only complaint about the case was that it didn’t come with a screen protector. It wasn’t hard to find a stick on screen protector online, but it would have been nice if the case included one for 360 degree protection.

This iPhone case travelled with me on scouting missions, spring turkey hunts and fall deer hunts. I really liked the phone case and never had any issues with it coming apart on me, in fact I was really impressed on how well it stayed together. One of my previous cases from another manufacturer used to come apart all the time, but the Fuse case just stayed together.

So how did the case hold up? My phone survived a few drops off of the counter top in my kitchen, it slipped out of my hand and dropped on the floor outside several times and I dropped it in the woods more times than I care to remember, but the case took the brunt of all of the hits and the phone didn’t get a scratch. Had I dropped the phone out of the tree stand it would have been a different story, I think only a fully enclosed phone case would really protect in the event of a 20 foot fall (which I’ve done with a previous case and my phone survived).

Overall this is a quality case for the iPhone. Add a clear antiglare screen protector and you’re set. If you’re looking for a stylish phone case give the Fuse Mossy Oak Rugged iPhone Case a try.

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Product Reviews

Bowtech Releases its First Carbon Riser Bow the Carbon Knight

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Bowtech Archery has released it’s first carbon riser bow – the Carbon Knight. Following the lead of Hoyt with the Carbon Matrix back in 2010, the new Carbon Knight from Bowtech weighs in at just 3.2 pounds (compared to 3.6 pounds for Hoyt’s Carbon Element G3).

Most manufacturers launch their new bows in the early fall (Bowtech usually launches their new bows at the ATA Show), but this one was “just too good to hold any longer,” says Samuel Coalson, Director of Marketing for Bowtech.

The Carbon Knight is said to have a smooth draw and plenty of speed at 330 feet per second. The Carbon Knight features Bowtech’s binary cam design, the Knight Riser constructed from durable carbon, a 7-inch brace height for forgiveness and a 32-inch axle-to-axle length. Draw lengths range from 26.5″ to 30.5″ and draw weights from 50 to 70 pounds in ten pound increments.

The bow is available in Black Ops and retails for $849 (Hoyt’s carbon bows are in the $1,200 range).

The new Carbon Knight definitely looks like an interesting bow and it’s a bow I’d like to try out and compare to some of the other carbon bows currently on the market. If you get a chance to shoot one leave a comment below and let us know what you think.

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The White Turkey – NY Bowhunter

Turkey Hunting

The White Turkey

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Check out this awesome turkey sent in by one of our readers. I’ve heard of white turkeys before, but I’ve never seen one myself. This bird is from our very own State of New York not too far north of New York City. I know if I saw one of these birds I’d put an arrow through this color phase turkey and get it mounted. What an awesome bird!

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Turkey Hunting

Spring Turkey Season Opens May 1 in New York

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Bowhunters take to the woods this spring after weary old gobblers in New York.

It’s my favorite time of year after deer season – the spring turkey season (probably because it’s the only other time I’m out hunting with my bow). Following suit of previous seasons, the 2014 spring turkey season opens May 1 in all of upstate New York lying north of the Bronx-Westchester County boundary and the annual youth turkey hunting weekend is April 26-27. The youth turkey hunt is open in all of upstate New York and Suffolk County.

Not nearly as popular as deer hunting, there only 100,000 turkey hunters expected to head afield this spring. Honestly, I don’t know how anyone can’t get excited about calling to a bird and have it respond and watch it work its way in. It’s a very interactive hunt.

According to the DEC, hunters must have a turkey hunting permit in addition to their small game hunting or sportsman license (if purchased before Feb. 1) or hunting license (if purchased after Feb. 1).

  • Shooting hours are from one-half hour before sunrise to noon each day.
  • Hunters may take two bearded turkeys during the spring season, but only one bird per day.
  • Hunters may not use rifles or handguns firing a bullet. Hunters may hunt with a shotgun or handgun loaded with shot sizes no larger than No. 2 or smaller than No. 8, or with a bow and arrow.
  • Crossbows may not be used for the spring 2014 turkey season.
  • Successful hunters must fill out the tag that comes with their turkey permit and immediately attach it to any turkey harvested.
  • Successful hunters must report their harvest within seven days of taking a bird.

One thing that caught my eye is that the state’s enacted 2014-15 budget includes language authorizing the use of crossbows for hunting under certain circumstances. So while hunters cannot use crossbows to take wild turkey during the 2014 spring season, they might be able to in 2015. It will be interesting to see if the changes go through for next year and what affect that would have on the number of hunters taking to the field for turkey hunting.

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Turkey Hunting

Bowhunting Turkey in New York

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Teresa took this big longbeard on the opening day of the 2012 Spring Turkey Hunting Season in Orange County, New York. This is Teresa’s first turkey kill and she got the job done with a heart-pounding 23-yard shot. Congrats to Teresa on an awesome longbeard!

Did you have success this spring? It was tough with the warm weather we had in April before the opener.

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Turkey Hunting

NY Bowhunter Takes Turkey During Fall Archery Season

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Last Friday morning my cousin Ken had the day off to enjoy a day afield. He was set up in his tree well before first light, but the morning was really slow and Ken only saw one deer. The tall spike came down the hill 50 yards to his right and kept on walking to wherever it was that he was going.

With no rubs or scrapes in the general area, Ken and his father Nick decided to hunt a different area that afternoon. On the drive to their hunting spot that afternoon they spotted a flock of turkeys and ten deer out in a field just a few door down from where they would be hunting.

Ken headed to his stand at the top of the hill and waited in anticipation for the deer and turkey to leave the field and move back into the hardwoods. Around 5:00 pm the woods exploded with noise and movement and the deer and turkey came barreling through the woods. Shortly after, Ken heard a lady yelling at her dog who must have decided it would be fun to chase the deer and turkeys out of the nearby field.

Then Ken heard a single turkey coming towards him from the bottom of the hill. Ken got ready and drew back with the bird at 20 yards. The bird took two more steps and Ken made a chirping sound to stop it and let the arrow fly. The bird only made it a few more yards before going down.

Congrats to Ken on taking a turkey with the bow, that’s never an easy thing!

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The Ultimate Practice Routine – TechnoHUNT – NY Bowhunter

Archery Tips

The Ultimate Practice Routine – TechnoHUNT

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When I purchased my bow at my local archery pro shop a few months ago the bow tech was telling me about this new TechnoHUNT system that they were having installed and would be up and running the following week.
I was clueless as to what exactly TechnoHUNT was so on my next visit to Flying Arrow Sports in Carmel they let me shoot it for free for fifteen minutes which was all I needed to get hooked! The TechnoHUNT system uses a projector and large screen to display 30 second clips of wildlife from whitetail deer to cape buffalo – your choice – and the archer then takes aim and shoots his arrows with special tips from 20 yards away. The animals are walking, eating, running, rubbing trees, lying down, etc. and the shot distance is simulated with life size game from 20 out to 40 yards (the shots are physically all at 20 yards, but the simulation can make a deer look to be as far as 40 yards away). It is up to the archer to decide if the shot is ethical or not. In some scenarios a buck will have a doe in front of him, or a buck will be walking and there is only a small opening between two limbs so you have to make a judgment call.At Flying Arrow Sports they charge $15 for one person to shoot a half hour round of TechnoHUNT and the more people you get in your group the cheaper it is per person. I chose to shoot whitetails and was able to get off about 50 shots shooting four arrows within the half hour. It was a very good session and I only had one miss – it was at a running deer and the clock was ticking so I decided to let an arrow fly and, of course, the deer stopped and I just cut its brisket. In real life I wouldn’t have taken a shot at that deer unless I was able to stop it, but this is just a game so you can take those shots you would question in the field and see what the end result would actually be. In my case the end result is – don’t shoot a running deer unless it stops. In the field I would have grunted at the deer to stop it, but unfortunately the deer in the simulator won’t hear you grunt so you can’t stop them.

 

TechnoHUNT is starting to pop up all across the country in local archery shops and even taxidermy studios. I would highly recommend shooting one if you have one in your local area.

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Archery Tips

Keep Your Bowhunting Skills Sharp with 3D Shooting

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Over the last few weekends we’ve been headed over to Blue Mountain Sportsman Center to shoot 3D. The course has been a lot of fun to shoot. There’s several targets to shoot at including deer, turkey, bear, and fox. The terrain makes it very realistic practice for hunting with shots at inclines and declines to simulate actual hunting scenarios.

One thing I like to do is shoot from the furthest stakes and guess the yardage. Then after we all shoot we range the target to see how close we were to guessing the distance. This really helps me to learn how to judge distance in the field and is a valuable tool for when an animal catches you off guard in the field. Shooting from the furthest stakes also make the closer shots seem easier.

If you haven’t been out shooting 3D this summer then you better hurry up and get out there because hunting season will be here before you know it. Blue Mountain Sportsman Center is open Thursday – Sunday and holidays. Shooting a round of 3D costs $12 with a county park pass and is $15 without a park pass.

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Archery Tips

Indoor Archery Leagues at Extreme Archery

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Team NYB will be joining the Hunter League at Extreme Archery set to begin on September 3rd. The Hunter League will be held on Fridays for 6 weeks and feature various animal targets.

We’re looking forward to participating in the league and sharpening our skills for the upcoming season. The indoor league is a great way to meet fellow archers and practice shooting under a little bit of pressure!

Here are the details on the Indoor Archery Leagues at Extreme Archery:

Kids League ($70, 8 weeks)
– begins Saturday, September 4th @ 10:00am

300 Target League ($90, 7 weeks)
– begins Wednesday, September 1st @ 6:30pm

Hunter League ($90, 6 weeks)
– begins Friday, September 3rd @ 6:30pm

Traditional League (TBD)
– call to find out more

To sign up for any of the Indoor Archery Leagues call Extreme Archery at 914-777-7500.

Extreme Archery is located at 801 East Boston Post Rd, Mamaroneck, NY 10543.

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Archery Tips

How to Set the Perfect Treestand

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This is something new I’m adding to my arsenal of tricks this season to help me set the perfect stand (works for trail cams too)! It’s called the Photographer’s Ephemeris, a tool designed to help landscape photographers take the perfect picture at sunrise or sunset.

The tool allows you to pick a location, date and time to see exactly where the sun and moon will be. This allows you to follow the path of the sun and moon on any given date and at any given time.

So how does this help the hunter? Simple. It allows the hunter to find a stand location on the map and then see how the sun will rise and set during the hunting season so that the sun is never in the hunter’s eyes.

I entered the location of our lease in the program and changed the date to opening day. Where we have our stands situated is in the perfect spot with the sun rising to our right and circling behind us before setting to our left. That means if the deer are out in the hunting plot where we hope to shoot them we will have the sun behind us which will make it much harder for the deer to pick us out of the tree.

This is a great tool I will be playing around with more and more this season as I hang some tree stands over the next few weeks. Below is a video on how it works:

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