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The Late Morning Longbeard – NY Bowhunter

Turkey Hunting

The Late Morning Longbeard

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One of my good friends Joe from Beyond Backpacks went out with his son during the first week of spring turkey season and had one crazy morning!

It started off with a ride up to Dutchess County early in the morning. As day began to break Joe and his son had a couple of Jakes gobble, but they would not commit to come in. Even so, it was an awesome experience as it was the first time Joe’s son had heard a turkey gobble.

Later that morning the two hunters walked around, but didn’t see anything else so they decided to head back for Mothers Day. On the drive back home Joe’s son asked if they could hunt one more time so Joe made a pit stop at another spot on the way home.

Around 10:30 a.m. they arrived at the second spot and Joe let out some yelps and excited cuts with no response. Joe and his son walked another five-hundred yards when he noticed some birds walking at the edge of the woods and told his son to set up so they could try and call the birds in.

Joe let out a couple of calls and then heard a hen talking back to him followed by a couple of gobbles. At first Joe though it was another hunter calling next to him and was waiting for the other hunter to shoot the gobbler, but then the hen stepped out in front of him with the gobbler not too far behind.

Joe waited until the boss Tom crossed the 20 yard mark and squeezed off a round from the 12 gauge. Joe’s son was shouting with excitement, “I got a turkey, I got a turkey!” It was a crazy and very exciting morning for Joe and his son and one they’ll never forget.

It’s father’s like Joe that help ensure there’s a future for our sport by introducing a child to hunting. Thanks for passing it on Joe!

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Turkey Hunting

Spring Turkey Season Opens May 1 in New York

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Bowhunters take to the woods this spring after weary old gobblers in New York.

It’s my favorite time of year after deer season – the spring turkey season (probably because it’s the only other time I’m out hunting with my bow). Following suit of previous seasons, the 2014 spring turkey season opens May 1 in all of upstate New York lying north of the Bronx-Westchester County boundary and the annual youth turkey hunting weekend is April 26-27. The youth turkey hunt is open in all of upstate New York and Suffolk County.

Not nearly as popular as deer hunting, there only 100,000 turkey hunters expected to head afield this spring. Honestly, I don’t know how anyone can’t get excited about calling to a bird and have it respond and watch it work its way in. It’s a very interactive hunt.

According to the DEC, hunters must have a turkey hunting permit in addition to their small game hunting or sportsman license (if purchased before Feb. 1) or hunting license (if purchased after Feb. 1).

  • Shooting hours are from one-half hour before sunrise to noon each day.
  • Hunters may take two bearded turkeys during the spring season, but only one bird per day.
  • Hunters may not use rifles or handguns firing a bullet. Hunters may hunt with a shotgun or handgun loaded with shot sizes no larger than No. 2 or smaller than No. 8, or with a bow and arrow.
  • Crossbows may not be used for the spring 2014 turkey season.
  • Successful hunters must fill out the tag that comes with their turkey permit and immediately attach it to any turkey harvested.
  • Successful hunters must report their harvest within seven days of taking a bird.

One thing that caught my eye is that the state’s enacted 2014-15 budget includes language authorizing the use of crossbows for hunting under certain circumstances. So while hunters cannot use crossbows to take wild turkey during the 2014 spring season, they might be able to in 2015. It will be interesting to see if the changes go through for next year and what affect that would have on the number of hunters taking to the field for turkey hunting.

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Turkey Hunting

Bowhunting Turkey in New York

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Teresa took this big longbeard on the opening day of the 2012 Spring Turkey Hunting Season in Orange County, New York. This is Teresa’s first turkey kill and she got the job done with a heart-pounding 23-yard shot. Congrats to Teresa on an awesome longbeard!

Did you have success this spring? It was tough with the warm weather we had in April before the opener.

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Turkey Hunting

NY Bowhunter Takes Turkey During Fall Archery Season

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Last Friday morning my cousin Ken had the day off to enjoy a day afield. He was set up in his tree well before first light, but the morning was really slow and Ken only saw one deer. The tall spike came down the hill 50 yards to his right and kept on walking to wherever it was that he was going.

With no rubs or scrapes in the general area, Ken and his father Nick decided to hunt a different area that afternoon. On the drive to their hunting spot that afternoon they spotted a flock of turkeys and ten deer out in a field just a few door down from where they would be hunting.

Ken headed to his stand at the top of the hill and waited in anticipation for the deer and turkey to leave the field and move back into the hardwoods. Around 5:00 pm the woods exploded with noise and movement and the deer and turkey came barreling through the woods. Shortly after, Ken heard a lady yelling at her dog who must have decided it would be fun to chase the deer and turkeys out of the nearby field.

Then Ken heard a single turkey coming towards him from the bottom of the hill. Ken got ready and drew back with the bird at 20 yards. The bird took two more steps and Ken made a chirping sound to stop it and let the arrow fly. The bird only made it a few more yards before going down.

Congrats to Ken on taking a turkey with the bow, that’s never an easy thing!

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The Longbow Longbeard – NY Bowhunter

Turkey Hunting

The Longbow Longbeard

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For the last few seasons, Terry has been successfully taking a longbeard on opening morning with his trusty stick bow. However, the 2011 season would soon prove to be a bit more challenging than previous seasons had been.

Unable to hunt opening morning, Terry headed to the woods on May 2nd to his favorite turkey hunting spot – a natural funnel between a small field next to a creek and a much larger field. Each night the birds roosted on a ridge just above the small field and as the day would break the woods would come alive with the sounds of turkeys until it was light enough for them to pitch down into the field.

With a lone decoy set up in the larger field just past the funnel connecting the smaller field to the larger one, Terry was set up and ready for a morning as he had experienced for the last four seasons.

As day began to break Terry heard multiple gobblers up on the roost. Terry let out some calls and got the birds fired up. He had four gobblers to his right and three gobblers to his left – it was bound to be an exciting morning.

When the first gobbler hit the ground he was on the wrong side of the creek, but he quickly started running towards Terry and flew right over the creek landing a mere three feet from him right in the funnel. Terry moved just a fraction of an inch and the bird picked him up and quickly disappeared into the larger field. With time running out before he had to head for work, Terry decided to get out of there and try again the next day. Of course, as Terry got up there were two more birds in full strut that had come in silence and the birds left as quick as they came.

The next morning Terry was back at it and this time had six gobblers sounding off at first light. Four of the longbeards hit the ground, shut up and chased after a few hens in another direction. Once the longbeards had their ladies there was no changing their mind – it’s tough to compete with the real thing.

Wednesday brought heavy rain and the birds were either silent or it was raining too hard to hear them – needless to say, it was a wash, pun intended.

Thursday brought clear skies and more rowdy gobblers. With three gobblers to his right and a group of hens on his left, Terry was smack dab in the middle of the entire flock. When the first bird gobbled Terry was shocked to realize the bird was roosted just 40 yards away with a second roosted in a tree not too far behind.

Terry let out a series of calls followed by a fly down cackle while flapping his hat to simulate a hen flying off the roost and just as he finished his calling sequence he heard one of the gobblers fly down. As the birds flew down into the field they saw Terry’s decoy and came charging in at full strut. With gobblers in full strut and their backs to Terry he drew back his longbow and aimed for the bulls eye. Fifteen yards later the bird was done.

It was a “long” season for Terry, but he was able to get it done with his stick and string again this year. Congrats to Terry on the ultimate challenge in bowhunting!

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Turkey Hunting

Spring Turkey Season Opens May 1 in New York

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Bowhunters take to the woods this spring after weary old gobblers in New York.

It’s my favorite time of year after deer season – the spring turkey season (probably because it’s the only other time I’m out hunting with my bow). Following suit of previous seasons, the 2014 spring turkey season opens May 1 in all of upstate New York lying north of the Bronx-Westchester County boundary and the annual youth turkey hunting weekend is April 26-27. The youth turkey hunt is open in all of upstate New York and Suffolk County.

Not nearly as popular as deer hunting, there only 100,000 turkey hunters expected to head afield this spring. Honestly, I don’t know how anyone can’t get excited about calling to a bird and have it respond and watch it work its way in. It’s a very interactive hunt.

According to the DEC, hunters must have a turkey hunting permit in addition to their small game hunting or sportsman license (if purchased before Feb. 1) or hunting license (if purchased after Feb. 1).

  • Shooting hours are from one-half hour before sunrise to noon each day.
  • Hunters may take two bearded turkeys during the spring season, but only one bird per day.
  • Hunters may not use rifles or handguns firing a bullet. Hunters may hunt with a shotgun or handgun loaded with shot sizes no larger than No. 2 or smaller than No. 8, or with a bow and arrow.
  • Crossbows may not be used for the spring 2014 turkey season.
  • Successful hunters must fill out the tag that comes with their turkey permit and immediately attach it to any turkey harvested.
  • Successful hunters must report their harvest within seven days of taking a bird.

One thing that caught my eye is that the state’s enacted 2014-15 budget includes language authorizing the use of crossbows for hunting under certain circumstances. So while hunters cannot use crossbows to take wild turkey during the 2014 spring season, they might be able to in 2015. It will be interesting to see if the changes go through for next year and what affect that would have on the number of hunters taking to the field for turkey hunting.

Continue Reading

Turkey Hunting

Bowhunting Turkey in New York

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Teresa took this big longbeard on the opening day of the 2012 Spring Turkey Hunting Season in Orange County, New York. This is Teresa’s first turkey kill and she got the job done with a heart-pounding 23-yard shot. Congrats to Teresa on an awesome longbeard!

Did you have success this spring? It was tough with the warm weather we had in April before the opener.

Continue Reading

Turkey Hunting

NY Bowhunter Takes Turkey During Fall Archery Season

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Last Friday morning my cousin Ken had the day off to enjoy a day afield. He was set up in his tree well before first light, but the morning was really slow and Ken only saw one deer. The tall spike came down the hill 50 yards to his right and kept on walking to wherever it was that he was going.

With no rubs or scrapes in the general area, Ken and his father Nick decided to hunt a different area that afternoon. On the drive to their hunting spot that afternoon they spotted a flock of turkeys and ten deer out in a field just a few door down from where they would be hunting.

Ken headed to his stand at the top of the hill and waited in anticipation for the deer and turkey to leave the field and move back into the hardwoods. Around 5:00 pm the woods exploded with noise and movement and the deer and turkey came barreling through the woods. Shortly after, Ken heard a lady yelling at her dog who must have decided it would be fun to chase the deer and turkeys out of the nearby field.

Then Ken heard a single turkey coming towards him from the bottom of the hill. Ken got ready and drew back with the bird at 20 yards. The bird took two more steps and Ken made a chirping sound to stop it and let the arrow fly. The bird only made it a few more yards before going down.

Congrats to Ken on taking a turkey with the bow, that’s never an easy thing!

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The Bowhunt for Spring Turkey Continues – NY Bowhunter

Turkey Hunting

The Bowhunt for Spring Turkey Continues

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It’s been a really tough week of hunting with lots of highs and lows. Locating the birds seems to be the easy part, calling them in isn’t too much of a challenge either it’s getting a gobbler to get in front of my one opening in the blind within 30 yards that’s the part I’m struggling with.

I’m hunting longbeards that live in hardwoods rather than the ones that spend most of their mornings strutting in open fields.

After watching a longbeard circle the blond yesterday a mere 50 yards away I figured it was time to bring back the decoys. I stopped using the decoys after they spooked a Jake on an earlier hunt.

This morning I stepped out of the truck and heard a familiar gobble on a nearby ridge. I had gone after this bird once before but he flew down away from me and never came in. This time I knew where he was headed so I circled down below him set the decoys up on the old logging road I figured he walks down on and set the blind up against a deadfall.

I took out my trusty diaphragm call an started talking to the bird. He liked what I was saying and I heard a crash behind me. The bird had flown in off the roost a long distance to get to me. He let out a thunderous gobble well within bow range of the blind – but of course, he picked the window to my right which was closed.

I waited in anticipation for the gobbler to charge the Jake decoy and give me my shot opportunity. That opportunity would never come. The next gobble I heard was considerably past the blind and he was walking away from me. I could hear he had crossed the creek and I quickly packed the blind and went up the hill to cut him off. I had a good idea of where he was headed.

I ditched the decoys at the top of the hill and headed to a strut zone in the open hardwoods. The bird continued to gobble as I quickly set up the blind. Once inside I started calling and the bird responded. Then the gobbles started getting further away and less frequent. By 6:45 a.m. the bird had gone silent on me and the woods got quiet…

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Turkey Hunting

Spring Turkey Season Opens May 1 in New York

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Bowhunters take to the woods this spring after weary old gobblers in New York.

It’s my favorite time of year after deer season – the spring turkey season (probably because it’s the only other time I’m out hunting with my bow). Following suit of previous seasons, the 2014 spring turkey season opens May 1 in all of upstate New York lying north of the Bronx-Westchester County boundary and the annual youth turkey hunting weekend is April 26-27. The youth turkey hunt is open in all of upstate New York and Suffolk County.

Not nearly as popular as deer hunting, there only 100,000 turkey hunters expected to head afield this spring. Honestly, I don’t know how anyone can’t get excited about calling to a bird and have it respond and watch it work its way in. It’s a very interactive hunt.

According to the DEC, hunters must have a turkey hunting permit in addition to their small game hunting or sportsman license (if purchased before Feb. 1) or hunting license (if purchased after Feb. 1).

  • Shooting hours are from one-half hour before sunrise to noon each day.
  • Hunters may take two bearded turkeys during the spring season, but only one bird per day.
  • Hunters may not use rifles or handguns firing a bullet. Hunters may hunt with a shotgun or handgun loaded with shot sizes no larger than No. 2 or smaller than No. 8, or with a bow and arrow.
  • Crossbows may not be used for the spring 2014 turkey season.
  • Successful hunters must fill out the tag that comes with their turkey permit and immediately attach it to any turkey harvested.
  • Successful hunters must report their harvest within seven days of taking a bird.

One thing that caught my eye is that the state’s enacted 2014-15 budget includes language authorizing the use of crossbows for hunting under certain circumstances. So while hunters cannot use crossbows to take wild turkey during the 2014 spring season, they might be able to in 2015. It will be interesting to see if the changes go through for next year and what affect that would have on the number of hunters taking to the field for turkey hunting.

Continue Reading

Turkey Hunting

Bowhunting Turkey in New York

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Teresa took this big longbeard on the opening day of the 2012 Spring Turkey Hunting Season in Orange County, New York. This is Teresa’s first turkey kill and she got the job done with a heart-pounding 23-yard shot. Congrats to Teresa on an awesome longbeard!

Did you have success this spring? It was tough with the warm weather we had in April before the opener.

Continue Reading

Turkey Hunting

NY Bowhunter Takes Turkey During Fall Archery Season

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Last Friday morning my cousin Ken had the day off to enjoy a day afield. He was set up in his tree well before first light, but the morning was really slow and Ken only saw one deer. The tall spike came down the hill 50 yards to his right and kept on walking to wherever it was that he was going.

With no rubs or scrapes in the general area, Ken and his father Nick decided to hunt a different area that afternoon. On the drive to their hunting spot that afternoon they spotted a flock of turkeys and ten deer out in a field just a few door down from where they would be hunting.

Ken headed to his stand at the top of the hill and waited in anticipation for the deer and turkey to leave the field and move back into the hardwoods. Around 5:00 pm the woods exploded with noise and movement and the deer and turkey came barreling through the woods. Shortly after, Ken heard a lady yelling at her dog who must have decided it would be fun to chase the deer and turkeys out of the nearby field.

Then Ken heard a single turkey coming towards him from the bottom of the hill. Ken got ready and drew back with the bird at 20 yards. The bird took two more steps and Ken made a chirping sound to stop it and let the arrow fly. The bird only made it a few more yards before going down.

Congrats to Ken on taking a turkey with the bow, that’s never an easy thing!

Continue Reading

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The Bowhunt for Spring Turkey Continues – NY Bowhunter

Turkey Hunting

The Bowhunt for Spring Turkey Continues

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It’s been a really tough week of hunting with lots of highs and lows. Locating the birds seems to be the easy part, calling them in isn’t too much of a challenge either it’s getting a gobbler to get in front of my one opening in the blind within 30 yards that’s the part I’m struggling with.

I’m hunting longbeards that live in hardwoods rather than the ones that spend most of their mornings strutting in open fields.

After watching a longbeard circle the blond yesterday a mere 50 yards away I figured it was time to bring back the decoys. I stopped using the decoys after they spooked a Jake on an earlier hunt.

This morning I stepped out of the truck and heard a familiar gobble on a nearby ridge. I had gone after this bird once before but he flew down away from me and never came in. This time I knew where he was headed so I circled down below him set the decoys up on the old logging road I figured he walks down on and set the blind up against a deadfall.

I took out my trusty diaphragm call an started talking to the bird. He liked what I was saying and I heard a crash behind me. The bird had flown in off the roost a long distance to get to me. He let out a thunderous gobble well within bow range of the blind – but of course, he picked the window to my right which was closed.

I waited in anticipation for the gobbler to charge the Jake decoy and give me my shot opportunity. That opportunity would never come. The next gobble I heard was considerably past the blind and he was walking away from me. I could hear he had crossed the creek and I quickly packed the blind and went up the hill to cut him off. I had a good idea of where he was headed.

I ditched the decoys at the top of the hill and headed to a strut zone in the open hardwoods. The bird continued to gobble as I quickly set up the blind. Once inside I started calling and the bird responded. Then the gobbles started getting further away and less frequent. By 6:45 a.m. the bird had gone silent on me and the woods got quiet…

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Turkey Hunting

Spring Turkey Season Opens May 1 in New York

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Bowhunters take to the woods this spring after weary old gobblers in New York.

It’s my favorite time of year after deer season – the spring turkey season (probably because it’s the only other time I’m out hunting with my bow). Following suit of previous seasons, the 2014 spring turkey season opens May 1 in all of upstate New York lying north of the Bronx-Westchester County boundary and the annual youth turkey hunting weekend is April 26-27. The youth turkey hunt is open in all of upstate New York and Suffolk County.

Not nearly as popular as deer hunting, there only 100,000 turkey hunters expected to head afield this spring. Honestly, I don’t know how anyone can’t get excited about calling to a bird and have it respond and watch it work its way in. It’s a very interactive hunt.

According to the DEC, hunters must have a turkey hunting permit in addition to their small game hunting or sportsman license (if purchased before Feb. 1) or hunting license (if purchased after Feb. 1).

  • Shooting hours are from one-half hour before sunrise to noon each day.
  • Hunters may take two bearded turkeys during the spring season, but only one bird per day.
  • Hunters may not use rifles or handguns firing a bullet. Hunters may hunt with a shotgun or handgun loaded with shot sizes no larger than No. 2 or smaller than No. 8, or with a bow and arrow.
  • Crossbows may not be used for the spring 2014 turkey season.
  • Successful hunters must fill out the tag that comes with their turkey permit and immediately attach it to any turkey harvested.
  • Successful hunters must report their harvest within seven days of taking a bird.

One thing that caught my eye is that the state’s enacted 2014-15 budget includes language authorizing the use of crossbows for hunting under certain circumstances. So while hunters cannot use crossbows to take wild turkey during the 2014 spring season, they might be able to in 2015. It will be interesting to see if the changes go through for next year and what affect that would have on the number of hunters taking to the field for turkey hunting.

Continue Reading

Turkey Hunting

Bowhunting Turkey in New York

Published

on

Teresa took this big longbeard on the opening day of the 2012 Spring Turkey Hunting Season in Orange County, New York. This is Teresa’s first turkey kill and she got the job done with a heart-pounding 23-yard shot. Congrats to Teresa on an awesome longbeard!

Did you have success this spring? It was tough with the warm weather we had in April before the opener.

Continue Reading

Turkey Hunting

NY Bowhunter Takes Turkey During Fall Archery Season

Published

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Last Friday morning my cousin Ken had the day off to enjoy a day afield. He was set up in his tree well before first light, but the morning was really slow and Ken only saw one deer. The tall spike came down the hill 50 yards to his right and kept on walking to wherever it was that he was going.

With no rubs or scrapes in the general area, Ken and his father Nick decided to hunt a different area that afternoon. On the drive to their hunting spot that afternoon they spotted a flock of turkeys and ten deer out in a field just a few door down from where they would be hunting.

Ken headed to his stand at the top of the hill and waited in anticipation for the deer and turkey to leave the field and move back into the hardwoods. Around 5:00 pm the woods exploded with noise and movement and the deer and turkey came barreling through the woods. Shortly after, Ken heard a lady yelling at her dog who must have decided it would be fun to chase the deer and turkeys out of the nearby field.

Then Ken heard a single turkey coming towards him from the bottom of the hill. Ken got ready and drew back with the bird at 20 yards. The bird took two more steps and Ken made a chirping sound to stop it and let the arrow fly. The bird only made it a few more yards before going down.

Congrats to Ken on taking a turkey with the bow, that’s never an easy thing!

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Team NYB Takes Two Toms Down – Part 2 – NY Bowhunter

Turkey Hunting

Team NYB Takes Two Toms Down – Part 2

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It was a little while longer before we heard another gobble, then another and another. There were at least three birds on the other side of the river and possibly a fourth. Around 5:45 am three hens flew into the field and started making their way towards the hardwoods.

Dero and I sat in the blind without moving or making a noise. We weren’t going to start calling until the hens left the field and at that point, our calling would be very little.

With the feeding hen decoy and Jake decoy set out 20 yards in front of us it was only a matter of time before one of the gobblers saw the decoys and came in. As the hens disappeared I began with my first sequence of yelps starting softly and then building up in volume – the birds gobbled right back. A few minutes later I did a similar sequence of yelps and then shut up.

Dero coached me as the birds came across the river and made it to our side of the field. I was sitting on the right side of the blind which is very thick and has lots of cover in front, blocking my view of the right side of the field. Dero saw one gobbler, then a second and a third.

Slowly and carefully I raised the shotgun and got ready for the birds as they approached. I knew there was a slight hill in front of us that would cause the birds to disappear and then pop up at 30 yards. Dero had the camera rolling and got his gun ready.

“I’ll take the one on the left,” Dero said. “I got the one on the right,” I replied. The only part we didn’t work out too well was how to both shoot!

The three gobblers popped over the hill and gobbled at the decoys. They approached the Jake decoy and started circling around to the right of the decoy. I wasn’t sure if they were getting themselves ready to pounce on the decoy or were getting nervous and ready to run so I steadied the bead and squeezed the trigger knocking the bird on the right down.

Dero didn’t have much time to react and quickly put a shot on the left bird before it made it down the hill. We had our first birds down of the season and a double on film to top it off!

The two birds were beautiful Toms, my bird had an 8″ beard and a 3″ beard with 1″ spurs while Dero’s bird had a 10 1/2″ beard and 1 1/2″ spurs! It was an incredible hunt and one we both won’t forget.

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Turkey Hunting

Spring Turkey Season Opens May 1 in New York

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Bowhunters take to the woods this spring after weary old gobblers in New York.

It’s my favorite time of year after deer season – the spring turkey season (probably because it’s the only other time I’m out hunting with my bow). Following suit of previous seasons, the 2014 spring turkey season opens May 1 in all of upstate New York lying north of the Bronx-Westchester County boundary and the annual youth turkey hunting weekend is April 26-27. The youth turkey hunt is open in all of upstate New York and Suffolk County.

Not nearly as popular as deer hunting, there only 100,000 turkey hunters expected to head afield this spring. Honestly, I don’t know how anyone can’t get excited about calling to a bird and have it respond and watch it work its way in. It’s a very interactive hunt.

According to the DEC, hunters must have a turkey hunting permit in addition to their small game hunting or sportsman license (if purchased before Feb. 1) or hunting license (if purchased after Feb. 1).

  • Shooting hours are from one-half hour before sunrise to noon each day.
  • Hunters may take two bearded turkeys during the spring season, but only one bird per day.
  • Hunters may not use rifles or handguns firing a bullet. Hunters may hunt with a shotgun or handgun loaded with shot sizes no larger than No. 2 or smaller than No. 8, or with a bow and arrow.
  • Crossbows may not be used for the spring 2014 turkey season.
  • Successful hunters must fill out the tag that comes with their turkey permit and immediately attach it to any turkey harvested.
  • Successful hunters must report their harvest within seven days of taking a bird.

One thing that caught my eye is that the state’s enacted 2014-15 budget includes language authorizing the use of crossbows for hunting under certain circumstances. So while hunters cannot use crossbows to take wild turkey during the 2014 spring season, they might be able to in 2015. It will be interesting to see if the changes go through for next year and what affect that would have on the number of hunters taking to the field for turkey hunting.

Continue Reading

Turkey Hunting

Bowhunting Turkey in New York

Published

on

Teresa took this big longbeard on the opening day of the 2012 Spring Turkey Hunting Season in Orange County, New York. This is Teresa’s first turkey kill and she got the job done with a heart-pounding 23-yard shot. Congrats to Teresa on an awesome longbeard!

Did you have success this spring? It was tough with the warm weather we had in April before the opener.

Continue Reading

Turkey Hunting

NY Bowhunter Takes Turkey During Fall Archery Season

Published

on

Last Friday morning my cousin Ken had the day off to enjoy a day afield. He was set up in his tree well before first light, but the morning was really slow and Ken only saw one deer. The tall spike came down the hill 50 yards to his right and kept on walking to wherever it was that he was going.

With no rubs or scrapes in the general area, Ken and his father Nick decided to hunt a different area that afternoon. On the drive to their hunting spot that afternoon they spotted a flock of turkeys and ten deer out in a field just a few door down from where they would be hunting.

Ken headed to his stand at the top of the hill and waited in anticipation for the deer and turkey to leave the field and move back into the hardwoods. Around 5:00 pm the woods exploded with noise and movement and the deer and turkey came barreling through the woods. Shortly after, Ken heard a lady yelling at her dog who must have decided it would be fun to chase the deer and turkeys out of the nearby field.

Then Ken heard a single turkey coming towards him from the bottom of the hill. Ken got ready and drew back with the bird at 20 yards. The bird took two more steps and Ken made a chirping sound to stop it and let the arrow fly. The bird only made it a few more yards before going down.

Congrats to Ken on taking a turkey with the bow, that’s never an easy thing!

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The Art of Stabilization – NY Bowhunter

Archery Tips

The Art of Stabilization

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One of the most overlooked accessories in archery is the stabilizer. When it comes to hunting stabilizers many archers say they don’t notice a difference in their shooting when they have a stabilizer on or have a stabilizer off – when in reality they don’t understand the true function of a stabilizer and have never used the correct one. In addition, many of today’s manufactures make stabilizers that serve as shock absorbers rather than stabilizers. To understand the purpose of a stabilizer we must take a look at some basic physics.

When you draw your bow back there are directional forces pulling on the bow in several directions – your sight, arrow rest, quiver, stabilizer and you pulling the string back all create forces on the bow’s riser. All of these directional forces have an effect on pin movement. If you draw your bow back and you’re pin is floating in big circles or a figure eight around the bulls eye on your target then you most likely do not have the right type of stabilizer for your bow. While it won’t be possible to eliminate all of that movement, it is possible to decrease it significantly which will help you hold your bow steadier and increase the tightness of your groups at longer yardages.

First, lets go over what a true stabilizer should accomplish. A stabilizer should be rigid all the way through without vibration dampening material in the middle of the stabilizer. Any vibration dampening material in place of a rigid bar stabilizer will allow the stabilizer to flex, reducing the stabilizers ability to resist movement (a stabilizer with a flexible end will still balance a bow, but it will never be able to effectively resist movement). Another feature you want to look for in a good stabilizer is a stack weight system at the end of the stabilizer. To effectively stabilize a bow the weight of the stabilizer should be as far in front of the bow’s riser as possible (hence why 3D archers use 30″ stabilizers with the weights at the end of the rod). The stack weight system allows the archer to use various weight combinations until the perfect resistence is found for the particular bow/shooter combination.

Newton’s first law of motion states that objects at rest tend to stay at rest. Unless the object is acted upon by an outside force, the object will remain at rest. We can use this theory to understand how a stabilizer helps reduce pin movement. Pin movement can be resisted by reducing the leverage your bow hand has on moving the weight at the end of your stabilizer. A longer stabilizer will have a greater effect on reducing the leverage your bow hand will have on moving the weight at the end of the stabilizer, thus making it harder for you pins to move off target. With the correct stabilizer screwed onto your bow’s riser sudden deliberet movements become difficult, which means subtle, unintentional movements are resisted and your pins remain steadier.

I went from using a 4.5″ SIMS S-Coil stabilizer weighing 4.7 ounces to a rigid Posten Woodsman 8″ stabilizer weighing around 9.5 ounces and instantly noticed a difference in both the weight of my bow and how much steadier I was able to hold the pins on my target. I didn’t want to go longer because this stabilizer is going to be used in hunting situations and I didn’t want it to get in the way, but I would go up to 10″ or 12″ to keep the stabilizer lighter – I needed to use heavier weights on my 8″ stabilizer to achieve the feel I would have been able to get from a 10″ stabilizer using lighter weights. The thing to remember here when trying to choose a stabilizer is that you can’t shorten a stabilizer that is too long, but you can add weight to a stabilizer that is too short to give you the feel of a longer stabilizer.

For more indepth information on stabilizers visit Jim Posten’s web site here. Jim also makes custom stabilizers and does a great job communicating with archers to help build them the perfect system to fit their needs.

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Archery Tips

Keep Your Bowhunting Skills Sharp with 3D Shooting

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Over the last few weekends we’ve been headed over to Blue Mountain Sportsman Center to shoot 3D. The course has been a lot of fun to shoot. There’s several targets to shoot at including deer, turkey, bear, and fox. The terrain makes it very realistic practice for hunting with shots at inclines and declines to simulate actual hunting scenarios.

One thing I like to do is shoot from the furthest stakes and guess the yardage. Then after we all shoot we range the target to see how close we were to guessing the distance. This really helps me to learn how to judge distance in the field and is a valuable tool for when an animal catches you off guard in the field. Shooting from the furthest stakes also make the closer shots seem easier.

If you haven’t been out shooting 3D this summer then you better hurry up and get out there because hunting season will be here before you know it. Blue Mountain Sportsman Center is open Thursday – Sunday and holidays. Shooting a round of 3D costs $12 with a county park pass and is $15 without a park pass.

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Archery Tips

Indoor Archery Leagues at Extreme Archery

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Team NYB will be joining the Hunter League at Extreme Archery set to begin on September 3rd. The Hunter League will be held on Fridays for 6 weeks and feature various animal targets.

We’re looking forward to participating in the league and sharpening our skills for the upcoming season. The indoor league is a great way to meet fellow archers and practice shooting under a little bit of pressure!

Here are the details on the Indoor Archery Leagues at Extreme Archery:

Kids League ($70, 8 weeks)
– begins Saturday, September 4th @ 10:00am

300 Target League ($90, 7 weeks)
– begins Wednesday, September 1st @ 6:30pm

Hunter League ($90, 6 weeks)
– begins Friday, September 3rd @ 6:30pm

Traditional League (TBD)
– call to find out more

To sign up for any of the Indoor Archery Leagues call Extreme Archery at 914-777-7500.

Extreme Archery is located at 801 East Boston Post Rd, Mamaroneck, NY 10543.

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Archery Tips

How to Set the Perfect Treestand

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This is something new I’m adding to my arsenal of tricks this season to help me set the perfect stand (works for trail cams too)! It’s called the Photographer’s Ephemeris, a tool designed to help landscape photographers take the perfect picture at sunrise or sunset.

The tool allows you to pick a location, date and time to see exactly where the sun and moon will be. This allows you to follow the path of the sun and moon on any given date and at any given time.

So how does this help the hunter? Simple. It allows the hunter to find a stand location on the map and then see how the sun will rise and set during the hunting season so that the sun is never in the hunter’s eyes.

I entered the location of our lease in the program and changed the date to opening day. Where we have our stands situated is in the perfect spot with the sun rising to our right and circling behind us before setting to our left. That means if the deer are out in the hunting plot where we hope to shoot them we will have the sun behind us which will make it much harder for the deer to pick us out of the tree.

This is a great tool I will be playing around with more and more this season as I hang some tree stands over the next few weeks. Below is a video on how it works:

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TAS Delta Rail Stabilizer & HipBone [PRODUCT REVIEW] – NY Bowhunter

Product Reviews

TAS Delta Rail Stabilizer & HipBone [PRODUCT REVIEW]

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PROS: Delta Rail Tactical Stabilizer – low-frequency range vibration dampening, side-to-side Picatinny rail adjustment to balance accessories, accepts additional weights upfront or adaptor for HipBone Bow Holder. HipBone Bow Holder – lightweight, easy to use, quick and quiet attachment and detachment of bow.

CONS: Delta Rail Tactical Stabilizer – more of an accessory attachment point than actual stabilizer, not heavily weighted at the end to counter directional forces at full draw, could use additional vibration dampening materials. HipBone Bow Holder – cable slide attachment could cause damage to cable rail or slide off while walking through the woods, no belt on bibs to attach bow holder for late-season hunting.

MSRP
$89.99 Delta Rail Tactical Stabilizer
$29.99 HipBone Bow Holder

I was contacted by Tactical Archery Systems back in November to try out some of the new products they had recently come out with. The company was coming out with a few products that were the first of their kind and I was excited to put them to the test.

The Delta Rail Tactical Stabilizer takes the popular Picatinny rail that has been used on firearms to mount a variety of accessories and brings this capability to the archery industry. Measuring 5 1/2″ in length, the Delta Rail Tactical Stabilizer keeps accessories mounted close to the bow so they don’t get in the way while hunting.

Weighing in at 8.1 ounces the Delta Rail Tactical Stabilizer is a little heavier than most archery stabilizers in this class, however, that is to be expected as this is a stabilizer meant for attaching accessories to the bow and its sole purpose isn’t vibration dampening.

There are a number of accessories you could attach to the Delta Rail Tactical Stabilizer whether it’s a bipod for ground hunting or light for bow fishing at night. To help keep the bow balanced when it’s loaded with accessories, the Picatinny rails were designed so they could be adjusted from side-to-side.

Another product that Tactical Archery Systems sent to me was the HipBone Bow Holder. As its name implies, the HipBone Bow Holder uses a ball and socket joint to hold the bow at your side. Simply slide the ball joint into the receiving end on the belt attachment and you’re ready to go.

The HipBone Bow Holder comes with a ball attachment for the threaded end of a stabilizer or to attach to the cable rod on some bows. I personally was not going to try and tighten down a set screw on the ball for the cable rod and risk damaging it and went with the stabilizer ball mount for my testing.

While the HipBone works great when you’re wearing pants that have belt loops and you can wear a belt, it didn’t work so great for me when I was wearing my bibs during the late season. I was able to get creative and hook the HipBone on the waist support of my backpack to allow me hands-free action while walking to my stand – a real plus in the winter when you’re bogged down with extra gear and need two hands to carry it all! I also left the HipBone attached to my backpack when I attached it to my pull up rope at my tree stand. This allowed me to hook my bow up to my backpack and pull them both up the tree at the same time once I had reached the platform.

Overall, I had a positive experience with the products from Tactical Archery Systems. If you have a specialized need for accessories at the end of your bow then the Delta Rail Tactical Stabilizer will work for you. If you’re looking for vibration dampening or to balance directional forces at full draw I’d suggest going with a more traditional archery stabilizer. For a quick and convenient way to hold your bow in those moments when you need an extra hand, the HipBone Bow Holder is there for you. It was definitely a “nice-to-have” item on my hunts and made it easy for me to do something with my bow when I didn’t want it in my hands.

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Product Reviews

Glider Gloves for Bowhunting Deer [PRODUCT REVIEW]

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PROS: touch screen smartphones (tested on iPhone) function with high degree of accuracy, comfortable lightweight material, long cuffs, 10 finger touch screen capability

CONS: fit was slightly off, fingers were a bit short on my pair, not durable enough for use as an active hunting glove, grip material on glove palm creates torque on the bow hand

MSRP: $24.99

Last season I was contacted by Glider Gloves to field test a pair of their Urban Style Touchscreen Gloves. I had previously reviewed a pair of similar gloves by a company called A glove so I welcomed the chance to review these.

Compared to the Agloves, these gloves were higher quality and had a much longer cuff which is something I always look for in a hunting glove. As social media becomes a larger part of hunting and a growing part of NYBowhunter.com I welcomed the chance to be able to easily send updated to my Facebook fans from the tree stand. The Glider Gloves made it easy to text and check email while keeping my hands warm and concealed from the eyes of any nearby whitetail deer.

One thing bowhunters should note is the gloves have a grip on the palm. Some bowhunters, including myself, prefer not to have any grip on their gloves as it helps create torque which lead to less accurate shooting.

These gloves are great at what they were designed to do – be a comfortable touchscreen glove. However, for hunting purposes, you have to remember what these gloves were designed to do. If you plan on wearing these in the field and climbing up to your tree stand day in and day out you’ll rip through these knit gloves in about a month. If you want these gloves to last as a hunting glove you’re better off waiting until you’re settled in the stand before putting them on so there’s less wear and tear on the gloves.

Overall, I’d recommend these gloves if you’re looking for a true touch screen glove. They’re way nicer to use than similar hunting gloves with a silver pad on the pointer finger and thumb. Just remember, they’re not made for hunting, so don’t expect them to last you for several seasons if you’re rough with them.

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Product Reviews

Fuse Mossy Oak Rugged iPhone Case [PRODUCT REVIEW]

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Last spring I was contacted by Paul at Fuse to try out a new case they had for the iPhone called the Mossy Oak Rugged Orange iPhone 4/4S Shell Case. It combined my two favorite colors – hunter orange and camo – so I gave the case a try.

The case is made up of an inner soft rubber case that acts as a shock absorber and a rigid polycarbonate frame on the out side for added protection.

What I really liked about this case was the fact that it wasn’t covered in a sticky rubber like some of my other iPhone cases so it didn’t pull my pocket out of my pants every time I reached for my phone. Another nice feature is the size of the case, it’s not oversized so you still feel like you have a slim smartphone.

My only complaint about the case was that it didn’t come with a screen protector. It wasn’t hard to find a stick on screen protector online, but it would have been nice if the case included one for 360 degree protection.

This iPhone case travelled with me on scouting missions, spring turkey hunts and fall deer hunts. I really liked the phone case and never had any issues with it coming apart on me, in fact I was really impressed on how well it stayed together. One of my previous cases from another manufacturer used to come apart all the time, but the Fuse case just stayed together.

So how did the case hold up? My phone survived a few drops off of the counter top in my kitchen, it slipped out of my hand and dropped on the floor outside several times and I dropped it in the woods more times than I care to remember, but the case took the brunt of all of the hits and the phone didn’t get a scratch. Had I dropped the phone out of the tree stand it would have been a different story, I think only a fully enclosed phone case would really protect in the event of a 20 foot fall (which I’ve done with a previous case and my phone survived).

Overall this is a quality case for the iPhone. Add a clear antiglare screen protector and you’re set. If you’re looking for a stylish phone case give the Fuse Mossy Oak Rugged iPhone Case a try.

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Product Reviews

Bowtech Releases its First Carbon Riser Bow the Carbon Knight

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Bowtech Archery has released it’s first carbon riser bow – the Carbon Knight. Following the lead of Hoyt with the Carbon Matrix back in 2010, the new Carbon Knight from Bowtech weighs in at just 3.2 pounds (compared to 3.6 pounds for Hoyt’s Carbon Element G3).

Most manufacturers launch their new bows in the early fall (Bowtech usually launches their new bows at the ATA Show), but this one was “just too good to hold any longer,” says Samuel Coalson, Director of Marketing for Bowtech.

The Carbon Knight is said to have a smooth draw and plenty of speed at 330 feet per second. The Carbon Knight features Bowtech’s binary cam design, the Knight Riser constructed from durable carbon, a 7-inch brace height for forgiveness and a 32-inch axle-to-axle length. Draw lengths range from 26.5″ to 30.5″ and draw weights from 50 to 70 pounds in ten pound increments.

The bow is available in Black Ops and retails for $849 (Hoyt’s carbon bows are in the $1,200 range).

The new Carbon Knight definitely looks like an interesting bow and it’s a bow I’d like to try out and compare to some of the other carbon bows currently on the market. If you get a chance to shoot one leave a comment below and let us know what you think.

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Team NYB Begins Management of New Property – NY Bowhunter

Bowhunting News

Team NYB Begins Management of New Property

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This weekend, team NYB took advantage of the warm weather and spent a day on our new property lease in Duchess County, NY to start preparing for spring turkey season.

We scouted the property to get everyone familiarized with the terrain, which consists mainly of grassy fields with a few hedgerows, surrounded by small areas of woods and a roadway along one side. A river bed runs just beyond the largest wooded area. This property will provide us with the opportunity to hunt different scenarios come the fall.

Based on our current knowledge of turkey activity on the property from veteran turkey hunter Jim Filardi, we picked a location at the point of a hedgerow over-looking one of the fields, to set up a natural ground blind. This location should give us maximum advantage for filming, and hopefully harvesting, some big spring gobblers.

As this is a natural blind, we will have to check on it a couple days before the season opens to ensure the blind is not badly weathered and to make any last minute adjustments. We plan to set up several decoys within bow range as well as a pop-up blind in the second hedgerow, in case we find the birds have roosted in a different location than expected.

The team is also currently researching how to best plant a food plot to establish a natural feeding area for deer that will maximize our bowhunting opportunities come the fall.

Stay tuned for updates on our strategies and preparations in managing the property leading into both turkey and deer season! Feel free to share your own strategies and experiences on the forum so we can all become more successful hunters this season!

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Bowhunting News

How to Shoot a Compound Bow Properly – Ultimate Guide

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Shooting a compound bow might seem as simple as picking up the bow, drawing the string with an arrow, and releasing it. If that’s how you think it works, then you’re dead wrong. It takes a world of knowledge and practice to learn how to properly shoot a compound bow. Luckily for you, we’re going to teach you how to do it with this compound bow shooting tutorial.

Preparing the Bow

Your compound bow should use high-quality strings that aren’t worn or heavily used. Your bow should be in good shape and properly maintained. You should be aware of how much draw pressure your bow can handle. If possible, use a compound bow that you’ve used before and that you’re familiar with, or use a compound bow that an expert archer has provided. Ideally, you should learn how to shoot a compound bow from someone who has a lot of experience shooting such a bow successfully.

Stance

You should face the target at about a 45-degree angle. Your feet should be parallel to one another and about 17-25 inches apart. Your toes should be directly facing the target. If you use such a stance you’ll have a much easier time drawing your bow and you’ll have a better chance of hitting your target dead-on.

Grip

Use a firm but relaxed grip with your bow-holding hand. If your grip is too tight on the bow then you won’t have as much accuracy on your shot. Try using a wrist sling if you are unable to master the art of a firm yet comfortable grip. Don’t be ashamed because the main point is accuracy and whatever you can do to attain the perfect shot is fine. Never, and I repeat NEVER, shoot with an open hand. You don’t ever want to grab the bow with your drawing hand during a shot – this is undoubtedly the worst mistake you can make when shooting a compound bow because it can lead to fatal errors.

Anchor

When you draw the string, you should be locking your string hand against the side of your face. This is what’s known as the “anchor” position. The string and your hand will be on the right side of your face, and vice versa if you are left-handed. You can achieve the highest level of archery accuracy by anchoring the string at the corner of your mouth – or under your chin.

Draw

You should extend your bow arm directly toward your target with the string gripped firmly between your fingers… or by using a mechanical release device, if you prefer. Point the bow at the target and pull the string smoothly and firmly. Extend the bow all the way, pull the string back to its maximum point of a full draw, and resist the urge to move the compound bow forward. Make sure that you use a bow that is suited for you because a bow with a draw that is too heavy will destroy your accuracy.

Aim

If you’re using a bow that is equipped with a sight then aiming will be easier, but it still won’t be perfect. Bow sights are good for average shooters, especially if a laser sight is involved. The key to natural aiming is practice. The best archers usually aim slightly above the target (depending on wind conditions) so they can aim while still looking directly at the target.

Release

Your release can determine whether or not your shot hits the mark. You need a smooth release, and you need to relax all of your fingers completely before you release the string for the shot. Even the slightest amount of finger tension can disrupt your aim. If you have a mechanical release aid the shot will be easier because all you have to do is draw, aim, and pull the release trigger for the compound bow. This type of mechanism can fail you, however… if you slap the trigger then the arrow will go astray.

Follow-Through

Just as in golf, the follow-through is extremely important in archery. Why? The arrow has already been released, right? You need to keep aiming until your arrow hits the target. The follow-through is largely a mental thing. You need to see your arrow hitting the target while you are steadily holding your bow. Never lower your bow after the arrow has been released. Stay in formation and hold your position until the arrow hits the target.

Practice

If you want to become an expert at shooting a compound bow then you need to practice. The saying “practice makes perfect” isn’t really true. You need to invoke the saying of “perfect practice makes perfect” because practicing something the wrong way will get you nowhere. When your target of choice is out of season then you shouldn’t lay back and watch TV until it’s time to hunt again. Set up targets and keep a compound bow in your hands as much as you can.

Conclusion

After reading this article there’s no excuse for becoming an expert compound bow shooter. From choosing the right equipment to shooting correctly there is an equation to correctly shooting a compound bow. Do you have any tips on shooting a compound bow? If so, we’d love to hear from you in the Comments section below.

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Bowhunting News

NYS DEC Misses the Mark with New Regulations

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New changes are heading our way for the 2015 deer season in New York. For those of us hunting in Westchester County and a few other WMUs that have historically had an overpopulation of deer we now have a newly created 2-week long antlerless-only season – the only problem is that it’s the first 2-weeks of bow season.

For some, that’s not an issue, but to others, it just crushed their chances of killing that buck they’ve been patterning since the season ended in 2014. Why? Because those first 2-weeks also happen to be the last few days you can catch a buck on its summer pattern.

The DEC says that management goals are not being met in these WMUs which is why we need the antlerless-only season. Well, I can tell you changing the first two weeks to antlerless-only is going to have a minimal impact, if any, on the antlerless harvest. The guys that want to shoot bucks will be spending their time in NJ or CT and the rest of us, well, we kill does all season long so it’s business as usual for us.

If the DEC really wanted to increase the antlerless harvest we could have looked to our neighbors over in CT and simply extended the hunting season for another month by starting in September, extending into January or both.

We also are still a 2-buck state (1 Regular Season buck tag, 1 Either Sex archery tag). If we dropped one of the tags, like most of the ‘big-buck’ states, and became a 1-buck state I think you’d also see the antlerless harvest go up…not to mention we’d probably have a few more decent bucks running around.

Time will tell how these new regulations end up working, but I think we already know, this isn’t going to work.

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Bowhunting News

NYS DEC Misses the Mark with New Regulations

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First meeting of 2014 for the WCBA

The Westchester County Bowhunters Association will hold its winter meeting on January 21,2014 at 7:00 p.m. at the Teatown Lake Reservation Ossining, NY.

One of the hot topics for discussion I’m sure will be the plans that Teatown has for using sharpshooters to cull 75 deer from the reservation property. Why Teatown isn’t using a free resource like Westchester County’s own bowhunters and is choosing to use taxpayer money to hire sharp shooters is beyond me. Hopefully, we get some answers on this Tuesday night.

About the WCBA: Since 1979, the Westchester County Bowhunters Association has worked at expanding the knowledge of local non-hunters in order that they understand the importance of sound wildlife conservation, and by that we mean effectively controlling Westchester County’s deer populations through Bow hunting.

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Team NYB Ends Turkey Season with a Double Bearded Bird – Part 1 – NY Bowhunter

Turkey Hunting

Team NYB Ends Turkey Season with a Double Bearded Bird – Part 1

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It was 4:15 a.m. on May 31st – the final morning of the 2010 Spring Turkey Season – when Dero and I met each other at the gate of the farm.

The season had been a tough one with few birds coming in close enough for a shot. Although we were lucky enough to hear gobbles on almost every occasion there were only two mornings that we had birds within gun or bow range.

Earlier in the week, we had hunted upstate only to have coyotes ruin one morning and oversleeping ruin the next. It was now or never for Team NYB.

The full moon lit the farm road as we walked through the field to our ground blind. We had recently asked the farmer to till some of the lands so we could plant for deer season, but had yet to hunt over it for turkey. It was this freshly tilled soil that would help us succeed on a late-season gobbler.

I first placed the Jake decoy in the grass where we had usually spread the decoys on previous hunts, but after returning to the blind Dero suggested I move the decoys. The field had grown so tall that the birds would have a very hard time seeing the decoys through the grass. The freshly tilled soil was at a 45-degree angle from our blind. Here the decoys would be visible from a distance and still within our shooting range.

Daybreak soon came and the songbirds played their tune. Missing was the sound of geese honking in the nearby river and turkeys gobbling from the roost. Then it happened – we heard our first gobble!

Dero and I looked at one another and were filled with excitement – it was the first time all season the birds were roosted on our side of the river! A few minutes later we heard a hen yelp – another first for us at the farm. On our previous hunts the hens never made a sound.

Patiently we waited for the birds to make their first move. A few minutes later we heard three short yelps behind us. The sounds kept getting closer and closer until the birds appeared in the field to our left…

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Turkey Hunting

Spring Turkey Season Opens May 1 in New York

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Bowhunters take to the woods this spring after weary old gobblers in New York.

It’s my favorite time of year after deer season – the spring turkey season (probably because it’s the only other time I’m out hunting with my bow). Following suit of previous seasons, the 2014 spring turkey season opens May 1 in all of upstate New York lying north of the Bronx-Westchester County boundary and the annual youth turkey hunting weekend is April 26-27. The youth turkey hunt is open in all of upstate New York and Suffolk County.

Not nearly as popular as deer hunting, there only 100,000 turkey hunters expected to head afield this spring. Honestly, I don’t know how anyone can’t get excited about calling to a bird and have it respond and watch it work its way in. It’s a very interactive hunt.

According to the DEC, hunters must have a turkey hunting permit in addition to their small game hunting or sportsman license (if purchased before Feb. 1) or hunting license (if purchased after Feb. 1).

  • Shooting hours are from one-half hour before sunrise to noon each day.
  • Hunters may take two bearded turkeys during the spring season, but only one bird per day.
  • Hunters may not use rifles or handguns firing a bullet. Hunters may hunt with a shotgun or handgun loaded with shot sizes no larger than No. 2 or smaller than No. 8, or with a bow and arrow.
  • Crossbows may not be used for the spring 2014 turkey season.
  • Successful hunters must fill out the tag that comes with their turkey permit and immediately attach it to any turkey harvested.
  • Successful hunters must report their harvest within seven days of taking a bird.

One thing that caught my eye is that the state’s enacted 2014-15 budget includes language authorizing the use of crossbows for hunting under certain circumstances. So while hunters cannot use crossbows to take wild turkey during the 2014 spring season, they might be able to in 2015. It will be interesting to see if the changes go through for next year and what affect that would have on the number of hunters taking to the field for turkey hunting.

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Turkey Hunting

Bowhunting Turkey in New York

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Teresa took this big longbeard on the opening day of the 2012 Spring Turkey Hunting Season in Orange County, New York. This is Teresa’s first turkey kill and she got the job done with a heart-pounding 23-yard shot. Congrats to Teresa on an awesome longbeard!

Did you have success this spring? It was tough with the warm weather we had in April before the opener.

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Turkey Hunting

NY Bowhunter Takes Turkey During Fall Archery Season

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Last Friday morning my cousin Ken had the day off to enjoy a day afield. He was set up in his tree well before first light, but the morning was really slow and Ken only saw one deer. The tall spike came down the hill 50 yards to his right and kept on walking to wherever it was that he was going.

With no rubs or scrapes in the general area, Ken and his father Nick decided to hunt a different area that afternoon. On the drive to their hunting spot that afternoon they spotted a flock of turkeys and ten deer out in a field just a few door down from where they would be hunting.

Ken headed to his stand at the top of the hill and waited in anticipation for the deer and turkey to leave the field and move back into the hardwoods. Around 5:00 pm the woods exploded with noise and movement and the deer and turkey came barreling through the woods. Shortly after, Ken heard a lady yelling at her dog who must have decided it would be fun to chase the deer and turkeys out of the nearby field.

Then Ken heard a single turkey coming towards him from the bottom of the hill. Ken got ready and drew back with the bird at 20 yards. The bird took two more steps and Ken made a chirping sound to stop it and let the arrow fly. The bird only made it a few more yards before going down.

Congrats to Ken on taking a turkey with the bow, that’s never an easy thing!

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Team NYB Ends Turkey Season with a Double Bearded Bird – Part 2 – NY Bowhunter

Turkey Hunting

Team NYB Ends Turkey Season with a Double Bearded Bird – Part 2

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Cautiously the two hens approached the decoys and continued yelping softly. As the two hens fed around the decoys we heard more yelping behind us – this time it was to our right. I caught a glimpse of movement through the brush on the right of our blind and told Dero to get ready. Two hens emerged from the tall grass in front of our blind not more than ten feet away and one was a bearded hen.

We now had four real hens in the field, a feeding hen decoy and a Jake decoy – the perfect set up for bringing in a long beard. The real hens, however, didn’t stick around too long and began feeding away from us. Then we heard another gobble, this time it came from the left side of the field.

From where I was sitting I couldn’t see the birds, but Dero could. Dero coached me through their movements. Softly I called imitating the hens and Dero began cutting with a friction call. This got the Tom all riled up and he began gobbling back at our calls.

Finally, I was able to see Tom in full strut at the other end of the field. Slowly he began making his way towards our decoys. The big Tom gobbled and strutted the whole way in. Then at about 40 yards the Tom noticed the Jake decoy and came running in.

The Tom circled the Jake decoy to display his dominance and then suddenly attacked the decoy. Dero had the camera rolling and after a few minutes said, “take him.” I steadied the bead on Tom’s head and slowly squeezed the trigger dropping the bird in its tracks! I don’t know who was more excited me or Dero, but we were both shaking!

I ran up to the bird and was shocked when I picked it up – this bird had long curved back spurs that measured 1 3/4″ long! This was an old Tom for sure. I ran back to the blind with the bird to show Dero and as I lifted the bird up I noticed this Tom had another surprise for me – a double beard! The first beard measured 8″ and the second beard was 10 1/2″ long. I had tagged out on two double bearded birds – something that rarely ever happens.

The 2010 Spring Turkey Season was now over and we had ended it on a high note. The days of waking up early to scout and hunt, the friendships we made over the course of the season, and memories in the field will never be forgotten. This was one of the toughest turkey seasons I can remember, but we stayed strong and kept at it until the end. I know this is one season I will never forget.

Accept the challenge. Never give up.

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Turkey Hunting

Spring Turkey Season Opens May 1 in New York

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Bowhunters take to the woods this spring after weary old gobblers in New York.

It’s my favorite time of year after deer season – the spring turkey season (probably because it’s the only other time I’m out hunting with my bow). Following suit of previous seasons, the 2014 spring turkey season opens May 1 in all of upstate New York lying north of the Bronx-Westchester County boundary and the annual youth turkey hunting weekend is April 26-27. The youth turkey hunt is open in all of upstate New York and Suffolk County.

Not nearly as popular as deer hunting, there only 100,000 turkey hunters expected to head afield this spring. Honestly, I don’t know how anyone can’t get excited about calling to a bird and have it respond and watch it work its way in. It’s a very interactive hunt.

According to the DEC, hunters must have a turkey hunting permit in addition to their small game hunting or sportsman license (if purchased before Feb. 1) or hunting license (if purchased after Feb. 1).

  • Shooting hours are from one-half hour before sunrise to noon each day.
  • Hunters may take two bearded turkeys during the spring season, but only one bird per day.
  • Hunters may not use rifles or handguns firing a bullet. Hunters may hunt with a shotgun or handgun loaded with shot sizes no larger than No. 2 or smaller than No. 8, or with a bow and arrow.
  • Crossbows may not be used for the spring 2014 turkey season.
  • Successful hunters must fill out the tag that comes with their turkey permit and immediately attach it to any turkey harvested.
  • Successful hunters must report their harvest within seven days of taking a bird.

One thing that caught my eye is that the state’s enacted 2014-15 budget includes language authorizing the use of crossbows for hunting under certain circumstances. So while hunters cannot use crossbows to take wild turkey during the 2014 spring season, they might be able to in 2015. It will be interesting to see if the changes go through for next year and what affect that would have on the number of hunters taking to the field for turkey hunting.

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Turkey Hunting

Bowhunting Turkey in New York

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Teresa took this big longbeard on the opening day of the 2012 Spring Turkey Hunting Season in Orange County, New York. This is Teresa’s first turkey kill and she got the job done with a heart-pounding 23-yard shot. Congrats to Teresa on an awesome longbeard!

Did you have success this spring? It was tough with the warm weather we had in April before the opener.

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Turkey Hunting

NY Bowhunter Takes Turkey During Fall Archery Season

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Last Friday morning my cousin Ken had the day off to enjoy a day afield. He was set up in his tree well before first light, but the morning was really slow and Ken only saw one deer. The tall spike came down the hill 50 yards to his right and kept on walking to wherever it was that he was going.

With no rubs or scrapes in the general area, Ken and his father Nick decided to hunt a different area that afternoon. On the drive to their hunting spot that afternoon they spotted a flock of turkeys and ten deer out in a field just a few door down from where they would be hunting.

Ken headed to his stand at the top of the hill and waited in anticipation for the deer and turkey to leave the field and move back into the hardwoods. Around 5:00 pm the woods exploded with noise and movement and the deer and turkey came barreling through the woods. Shortly after, Ken heard a lady yelling at her dog who must have decided it would be fun to chase the deer and turkeys out of the nearby field.

Then Ken heard a single turkey coming towards him from the bottom of the hill. Ken got ready and drew back with the bird at 20 yards. The bird took two more steps and Ken made a chirping sound to stop it and let the arrow fly. The bird only made it a few more yards before going down.

Congrats to Ken on taking a turkey with the bow, that’s never an easy thing!

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